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Honkan

The original Main Gallery (designed by the British architect Josiah Conder) was severely damaged in the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923. In contrast to western style of the original structure, the design of the present Honkan by Watanabe Jin is the more eastern "Emperor's Crown Style." Construction began in 1932, and the building was opened in 1938.
24 exhibition rooms on two floors provide a thorough introduction into Japanese art: "Highlights of Japanese Art" on the second floor introduces the development of Japanese art from Jomon through to the Edo period in a chronological manner, and genre galleries presenting specific rooms displaying ceramics, swords, lacquerwares, sculptures, modern decorative arts as well as the material culture of Ainu and Ryukyu are located on the first floor.

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2nd floor "Highlights of Japanese Art"

  
The Dawn of Japanese Art: Jomon, Yayoi and Kofun periods
Room 1  November 25, 2015 (Wed) - May 29, 2016 (Sun)

The Jomon culture began around 12,000 years ago. Earthenware vessels of this age with various motifs and styles are the starting point of "Highlights of Japanese Art." In the Yayoi period (450 B.C.- A.D. 250), pottery with a simplistic yet refined beauty and dotaku bell-shaped bronzes were prominent. Typical objects from the Kofun period (A.D. 250-600), such as haji, sue wares and haniwa figurines, as well as mirrors, arms and armor, saddlery, and accessory, which expresses the essence of metal and glass craftsmanship, are also featured.

Current exhibit includes:
Haniwa (Terracotta tomb figurine), Dancing people, female, Excavated from Nohara Tumulus, Miyawaki, Nohara, Kumagaya-shi, Saitama, Kofun period, 6th century
Dancing People, Haniwa (Terracotta tomb figurine),
Excavated from Nohara Tumulus, Miyawaki, Nohara, Kumagaya-shi, Saitama, Kofun period, 6th century
Dogu (Clay Figurine),
From Kamikurokoma, Misaka-cho, Fuefuki-shi, Yamanashi, Jomon period, 3000-2000 BC (Gift of Mr. Miyamoto Naokichi)
Stone Object with Human Face Ornament,
From Kaminemoto, Tono-machi, Iwaki-shi, Fukushima, Jomon period, 2000-1000 BC (Private collection)
Visored Helmet,
From Otsuka Tumulus, Chuo-shi, Yamanashi, Kofun period, 5th century
Footed Stand with Vessels, Sue Stoneware,
From Kanmuriyama tumulus, Shimoashimori, Kita-ku, Okayama-shi, Okayama, Kofun period, 6th century

  
The Rise of Buddhism: Asuka - Nara period
Room 1  January 19, 2016 (Tue) - February 28, 2016 (Sun)

In the mid-6th century, Buddhism was officially introduced into Japan from the kingdom of Baekje on the southeastern coast of the Korean peninsula. Japanese culture made a remarkable progress with the adoption of Buddhism. This gallery features early Buddhist statues, sutras, reliquaries, and ritual implements from the Asuka and Nara periods.

Current exhibit includes:
Standing Eleven-headed Kannon (Ekadasamukha), Excavated at Mount Nachi, Nachikatsu'ura-cho, Higashimuro-gun, Wakayama, Asuka period, 7th century (Gift of Mr. Kitamata Tomeshiro and two others)
Daichido kyo Sutra, From the Ishiyamadera issai kyo sutra compilation, Vol. 75,
Nara period, dated 734 (Lent by Enpukuji, Chiba)
Fuku kenjaku jinshu shin kyo (Heart Sutra of the Divine Incantation of Amoghapasa),
Nara period, 8th century (Lent by Saidaiji, Nara)
Ritual Objects Used to Consecrate Site of Kohfukuji Temple,
Excavated from under altar of Main Hall at Kohfukuji, Nara, Nara period, 8th century (National Treasure)

  
Room 2  January 19, 2016 (Tue) - February 14, 2016 (Sun)

These two scrolls are from a set of ten, on which ten historical figures from India, China, and Japan are depicted. The ten figures include high priests associated with the Tendai sect of Buddhism as well as Japan’s Prince Shotoku (574–622). Prince Shotoku, among his other achievements, wrote, for the first time in Japan, a book of annotations for the Lotus Sutra, on which the doctrines of the Tendai sect are based. The scrolls here feature Zenmui and Priest Emon Daishi.
Zenmui (637–735) was born into a noble family in India. He became the King of the ancient kingdom of Magadha, but renounced the world following a major battle in which he fought against his own siblings. He later traveled to China, where he translated important sutras for esoteric Buddhism, including the Mahavairocana Sutra, into Chinese. The figures were probably selected from the viewpoint of the Japanese Tendai sect, which respected the doctrines of esoteric Buddhism. Emon (dates unknown) was a high priest who was active during China’s Northern and Southern dynasties period (439–589). The founder of the Tendai sect, Priest Zhiyi, was a second-generation disciple of Priest Emon Daishi.  
At first glance, the large motifs in both paintings look as if they were simply executed, but closer inspection reveals subtle renderings in the depiction of the hair, beard, and eyelashes, as well as the patterns on the garments. Another notable feature is the sophisticated use of light, soft colors, which was achieved by white-tinged hues and white lines. The liberal use of light and gentle colors as seen in these paintings is a feature commonly found in Buddhist art of the mid-Heian period (794–1192). Spontaneous yet gentle and delicate depictions are a highlight of these works.

On Exhibit:
Zenmui and Emon Daishi, Heian period, 11th century (National Treasure, Lent by Ichijoji, Hyogo)

  
Buddhist Art: Heian - Muromachi period
Room 3  January 19, 2016 (Tue) - February 28, 2016 (Sun)

Buddhist art is one of the major genres that define Japanese art. Many masterworks date from the late Heian period, a time characterized as classical in Japanese art history. After the Kamakura period, Buddhist art further developed in its materials, methods, and styles as Zen schools and other new Buddhist schools emerged, together with the influence from the Chinese arts. This exhibit features artworks from the Heian to Kamakura periods, when Buddhist art most flourished, adding siginificant objects from the Nanbokucho and Muromachi periods.

Current exhibit includes:
Standing Bishamon Ten (Vaisravana), Heian period, 12th century (Gift of the Kataoka family)
Nirvana,
Kamakura period, 12th-13th century (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Shinyakushiji, Nara)
Fukukenjaku Jinshu Shingyo (Heart sutra of the divine incantation of Amoghapasa),
By Saionji Kinhira, Kamakura period, dated 1306 (Important Cultural Property)
Words of Prayer,
By Eizon, Kamakura period, dated 1269 (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Hannyaji, Nara)
Surviving Scroll of Illustrated Legends about Shitennoji Temple,
By Koremune Sueshige, Heian period, dated 1173 (Jo'an 3) (Lent by Sanzen'in, Kyoto, Important Cultural Property, Lent by Sanzenin, Kyoto)
Kei Gong,
Heian period, 12th century (National Treasure, Lent by Zenrinji, Kyoto)

  
Courtly Art: Heian - Muromachi period
Room 3  January 19, 2016 (Tue) - February 28, 2016 (Sun)

The courtiers were strongly involved in the arts through the Heian and Muromachi periods, their aesthetic tastes playing a great role in Japanese art history. Literature works such as waka poems and other calligraphy written by courtiers, and e-maki narrative picture scrolls are displayed in this room with decorative art objects.

Current exhibit includes:
Horse Stables, Muromachi period, 16th century (Important Cultural Property, Gift of Mr. Okazaki Masaya)
Letter of Entreaty,
By Fujiwara no Teika, Kamakura period, 13th century (Important Cultural Property)

  
Zen and Ink Painting: Kamakura - Muromachi period
Room 3  January 19, 2016 (Tue) - February 28, 2016 (Sun)

This gallery features works by famous artists of the landscape-painting genre, along with famous works of bokuseki (calligraphy by Zen priests).

Current exhibit includes:
Shoulao (God of longevity) under Plum Tree, Attributed to Sesshu Toyo, Muromachi period, 15th century (Important Art Object)
Calligraphy in One Line,
By Sesson Yubai, Nanbokucho period, 14th century (Gift of Mr. Koizumi Yutaro)

  
The Art of Tea Ceremony
Room 4  January 2, 2016 (Sat) - March 13, 2016 (Sun)

This gallery highlights the way of tea through its various art works such as paintings and calligraphy, vases, vessels for kaiseki meals, kettles, tea caddies, and tea bowls.

Current exhibit includes:
Tea Bowl, Known as “Furisode”, Mino ware, Shino type, Azuchi-Momoyama - Edo period, 16th-17th century
Water Jar in Shape of Gold Powder Bag, Yellow glaze, Takatori ware, Edo period, 17th century
Nom de Plume “Korin” Given to a Pupil, By Tetto Giko, Nanbokucho period, 14th century

  
Attire of the Military Elite: Heian - Edo period
Room 5 & 6  January 2, 2016 (Sat) - March 21, 2016 (Mon)

Beginning with the sword which is the most important possession of a samurai, this gallery focuses on arms and armor, saddlery, attire of the warriors as well as their portraits and hand-writings.

Current exhibit includes:
Domaru Type Armor, With black leather lacing in katatsumadori style, Muromachi period, 15th century (Important Cultural Property)
Tachi SwordKnown as “Uesugi Tachi”,
Ichimonji school, Kamakura period, 13th century (National Treasure)
Hyogo gusari no tachi Style Sword MountingWith scabbard decorated with birds/Known as “Uesugi Tachi”,
Kamakura period, 13th century (National Treasure)
Ichinotani Style Helmet, Iris leaf design,
Azuchi-Momoyama - Edo period, 16th-17th century

  
Folding Screens and Sliding Door Paintings: Azuchi-Momoyama - Edo period
Room 7  January 26, 2016 (Tue) - March 6, 2016 (Sun)

This gallery is dedicated to the genre of shohei-ga, which includes mural paintings, fusuma paintings and byobu paintings. The room is especially designed for an effective display of grand-scale paintings.

Current exhibit includes:
Four Elegant Pastimes for Court Ladies, By Kaiho Yusho, Azuchi-Momoyama - Edo period, 16th-17th century (Important Cultural Property)

  
The Arts of Daily Life: Azuchi-Momoyama - Edo period
Room 8  January 26, 2016 (Tue) - April 17, 2016 (Sun)

The maturing of Japanese culture supported by the military and commoner classes continued throughout the Azuchi-Momoyama and Edo periods. This gallery introduces the craft of interior furnishings and daily utensils that adorned the life of the people during these periods.

Current exhibit includes:
Picnic Set, Hollyhock crest design in maki-e lacquer, Edo period, 19th century
Yogi (Bedclothes), Light blue woolen twill ground (with wisteria crests),
Formerly preserved by feudal retainer of the Kurume domain, Edo period, 18th-19th century (On exhibit through March 6, 2016)
Ko'uchiki (Outer garment with wide sleeves),
Edo period, 19th century (Gift of Mr. Matsudaira Josho, On exhibit from March 8, 2016)
Sake Ewer in Shape of Gourd,
By Funada Ikkin, Edo period, dated 1843
Set of Dishes, Cherry tree design in overglaze enamel,
Nabeshima ware, Edo period, 18th century

  
Developments in Painting and Calligraphy: Azuchi-Momoyama - Edo period
Room 8  January 26, 2016 (Tue) - March 6, 2016 (Sun)

This gallery introduces the dynamic and multi-faceted world of paintings and calligraphy from the Azuchi-Momoyama to the Edo period.

Current exhibit includes:
Pine Tree, Plum Blossoms, and Crane, By Ito Jakuchu, Edo period, 18th century (Gift of Mrs. Uematsu Kayoko)
Poems on Eight Views of the Xiao and Xiang Rivers,
By Prince Priest Doko, Edo period, 17th century (Private collection)

  
Noh and Kabuki: Kabuki Costumes
Room 9  January 2, 2016 (Sat) - March 6, 2016 (Sun)

Noh developed from Sarugaku, a type of theater performed at temple and shrine festivals in the Muromachi period (1392–1573). It reached a peak under the actor and playwright Ze'ami around the early 14th century. From the mid-Edo period in the 18th century, Noh became the ceremonial theater of Japan's ruling warrior class. Under their patronage, its style changed to suit their tastes, which is reflected by the lavish, gold-woven Noh costumes still used today.Costumes from the Azuchi-Momoyama period (1573–1603), however, show a different style, which was inherited from the preceding Muromachi period when Noh reached a peak.
Most Noh costumes from the Azuchi-Momoyama period that have survived intact are designated Important Cultural Property because of their rarity. This exhibition will display five such cultural properties in addition to other costumes

Current exhibit includes:
Suo (Noh costume), Flowering plant and scattered square papers design on dark blue ramie ground, Muromachi - Azuchi-Momoyama period, 16th (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Kasuga jinja, Gifu)
Nuihaku (Noh costume), Flowering plant design at top and bottom on white ground,
Passed down by the Konparu Troupe, Azuchi-Momoyama period, 16th century (Important Cultural Property)
Nuihaku (Noh costume), Lily and courtly carriage design on brown ground,
Passed down by the Konparu Troupe, Azuchi-Momoyama period, 16th century (Important Cultural Property)
Sobatugi (Noh costume), Flower and bird design on dark blue satin,
Muromachi - Azuchi-Momoyama period, 16th century (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Kasuga Jinja, Gifu)
Happi (Noh costume), Cloud and dragon design in mixed cotton and silk weave on brown ground,
Muromachi - Azuchi-Momoyama period, 16th century (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Kasuga Jinja, Gifu)

  
Ukiyo-e and Fashion in the Edo Period: Ukiyo-e
Room 10  January 19, 2016 (Tue) - February 14, 2016 (Sun)

In the early Edo period (1603–1868), ukiyo-e, which depicted common people, consisted only of paintings. A method of woodblock printing was later devised and mass production of ukiyo-e became possible. This exhibition mainly comprises works with motifs such as plum blossoms and snow that are suitable for February. The lineup contains works by artists who were active during various stages in the development of ukiyo-e. They include early monochrome prints and paintings by Hishikawa Moronobu (?–1694), who is regarded as the founder of ukiyo-e prints, as well as multicolored nishiki-e prints by Suzuki Harunobu (1725?–70), Kitagawa Utamaro (1753?–1806), and Utagawa Kunisada (1786–1864).

Current exhibit includes:
Parody of Poem about Evening Plum by Shunzei, By Suzuki Harunobu, Edo period, 18th century
Lineup of Contemporary Popular Beauties: Takigawa,
By Kitagawa Utamaro, Edo period, dated 1794
Scenes from Theaters and Yoshiwara Pleasure Quarters,
By Hishikawa Moronobu, Edo period, 17th century

  
Ukiyo-e and Fashion in the Edo Period: Fashion
Room 10  January 2, 2016 (Sat) - March 6, 2016 (Sun)

Introduces the fashion of the Edo period townspeople. Enjoy comparing with the ukiyo-e works exhibited in the same room.

Current exhibit includes:
Kosode (Garment with small wrist openings), Cherry, pine, and crane design on parti-colored figured satin ground, Edo period, 17th century (Important Cultural Property)
Kosode (Garment with small wrist openings), Tachibana and noshi ribbon design on reddish-black figured satin ground, Edo period, 17th century
Inro (Medicine case), Young pine and crane design in maki-e lacquer,
Edo period, 19th century

2nd floor

  
Netsuke: The Prince Takamado Collection
The Prince Takamado Collection Room  January 26, 2016 (Tue) - April 17, 2016 (Sun)

 Including:
Cut Piece: Apple, Akira Kuroiwa
Hagoromo,
By Isshu Kishi, 1988
Grooming,
By Kiho Takagi, 1995
Owl,
By Onosato Zanmai, 2002
Hatching Gecko,
By Susan Wraight, 1997

1st floor

  
Japanese Sculpture
Room 11  January 2, 2016 (Sat) - April 17, 2016 (Sun)

This gallery introduces the history of sculptural art in Japan through prototypical wood-sculptures featuring examples dating from the Heian and Kamakura periods, the zenith of Japanese sculpture.

Current exhibit includes:
Standing Bishamon Ten (Vaisravana), Formerly kept at Jibutsudo Hall of Jurin'in, in former Nakagawadera, Nara, Heian period, ca. 1162 (Important Cultural Property, Gift of Mr. Kawabata Ryushi)
Seated Nyoirin Kannon Bosatsu (Cintamanicakra), Heian period, 11th century (Lent by Saidaiji, Nara)
Standing Komoku Ten (Virupakusa), Heian period, 12th century (National Treasure, Lent by Joruriji, Kyoto)
Standing Juni Shinsho (Twelve Heavenly Generals): Shinshin (Monkey General), Formerly owned by Joruriji, Kyoto, Kamakura period, 13th century (Important Cultural Property)
Standing Juni Shinsho (Twelve Heavenly Generals), Kamakura period, 12th - 13th century (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Sogenji, Kanagawa)

  
Lacquerware
Room 12  February 9, 2016 (Tue) - April 24, 2016 (Sun)

Features maki-e works from Heian to Edo period. The exhibit shows the history and beauty of maki-e, a unique lacquerwork method that developed in Japan.

Current exhibition includes:
Tebako (Cosmetic box), Cart wheels in stream design in mother of pearl inlay, Kamakura period, 13th century (National Treasure)
Saddle, Lion design in mother of pearl inlay,
Heian-Kamakura period, 12th-13th century (Important Cultural Property, Gift of Mr. Kano Jigoro)
Lamp Stand, Hosoge flower design in mother of pearl inlay and Heijin maki-e lacquer,
Heian period, 12th century (National Treasure, Lent by Daichojuin, Iwate)
Tebako (Cosmetic box) and Contents, Plum design in maki-e lacquer,
Kamakura period, 13th century (National Treasure, Lent by Mishima Taisha, Shizuoka)

  
Water Dropper
Room 13  January 2, 2016 (Sat) - April 17, 2016 (Sun)

This exhibition consists of water droppers (suiteki), which are implements used when preparing ink for calligraphy or painting. They have elaborate shapes and designs, and are usually ceramic, although metals such as copper and brass were also commonly used to make them. The 442 metal water droppers that Watanabe Toyotaro (Sen'en) donated to the museum in 2013 comprise one of the largest and most important collections of this genre. For this exhibition, we have selected 117 animal-shaped works from this collection.
The variety of the animals depicted and the unrestricted artistic expression of wax casting, the metalwork technique used to create these works, are attractive features of this exhibition.

Current exhibit includes:
Water Dropper, Horse design, Edo period, 18th-19th century (Gift of Mr. Watanabe Toyotaro and Mr. Watanabe Masayuki)
Water Dropper, Long-eared hare design,
Edo period, 18th-19th century (Gift of Mr. Watanabe Toyotaro and Mr. Watanabe Masayuki)
Water Dropper, Mouse design,
Meiji era, 19th-20th century (Gift of Mr. Watanabe Toyotaro and Mr. Watanabe Masayuki)
Water Dropper, Blue magpie design,
Edo period, 18th-19th century (Gift of Mr. Watanabe Toyotaro and Mr. Watanabe Masayuki)
Water Dropper, Snail design,
Edo period, 18th-19th century (Gift of Mr. Watanabe Toyotaro and Mr. Watanabe Masayuki)

  
Japanese Swords
Room 13  January 2, 2016 (Sat) - March 13, 2016 (Sun)

Exhibits selected swords and sword-fittings from the Heian to Edo periods, including the Tachi SwordBy Yasutsuna.

Current exhibit includes:
Tachi Sword, Known as “Dojigiri Yasutsuna”, By Yasutsuna, Heian period, 10th-12th century (National Treasure)
Katana Sword,
By Masamune, Kamakura period, 14th century (National Treasure)
Sword Guard, Bodhidharma design,
By Kane'ie, Azuchi-Momoyama period, 16th century (Important Cultural Property, Private collection)

  
Ceramics
Room 13  January 19, 2016 (Tue) - April 17, 2016 (Sun)

From Japan's first glazed ceramics of the Nara period to the various wares of the late Edo period, the exhibits will introduce the history of Japanese ceramics through masterworks according to time period and production sites.

Current exhibit includes:
Large Jar, Natural glaze, Tokoname ware, Heian period, 12th century (Important Cultural Property, Private collection)
Square Dish, Design of Chinese poet watching seagulls in underglaze iron,
By Ogata Korin and Shinsei, Edo period, 18th century (Important Cultural Property)
Bowl, Cherry tree design in openwork and overglaze enamel,
By Nin'nami Dohachi, Edo period, 19th century

  
Room 14  January 2, 2016 (Sat) - February 28, 2016 (Sun)

In connection with the New Year season, this exhibition features works with “scattered fan” designs, giving special attention to the auspicious nature of these designs and the diverse paintings that decorate each of their fans. The fans in scattered fan designs have different shapes and are decorated with various paintings, qualities which made these designs interesting to the Japanese. In particular, there are a number of fine cosmetic boxes, which were used to keep cosmetics and other miscellaneous objects for everyday use, that feature scattered fan designs in maki-e lacquer.
We invite visitors to view these designs not only as auspicious decorations, but also to enjoy the individual paintings on each of their fans.

Current exhibit includes:
Tebako (Cosmetic box), Scattered fan design in maki-e lacquer, Kamakura-Nanbokucho period, 14th century (Important Cultural Property, Lent by the OKURA MUSEUM OF ART)
Tebako (Cosmetic box), Scattered fan design in maki-e lacquer,
Muromachi period, 15th century (Important Cultural Property)
Mirror, Scattered fan design,
Nanbokucho period, 14th century
Kosode (Garment with small wrist openings), Young pine, cherry blossom, and curtain design on white figured satin ground,
Edo period, 18th century

  
Room 15  January 2, 2016 (Sat) - February 28, 2016 (Sun)

The architectural historian Sekino Tadashi (1867–1935) surveyed temples, palaces, tombs, and other historical sites and structures across China in 1930–1935. The Asian architectural historian Takeshima Takuichi (1901–1992) accompanied Sekino as his assistant, keeping a record of the survey and taking photographs.
In order to conduct a thorough study of these photographs, the museum cooperated with the Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia (University of Tokyo), which had received related materials from the Institute for Oriental Culture, to which Sekino and Takeshima had belonged. These efforts led to the publication of a catalogue in FY2014. This exhibition features a number of Takeshima's photographs, some of which even display historical sites and structures that no longer exist.

Current exhibit includes:
Side of Standing Camel Statue, Ming Xiaoling Mausoleum, Dated 1918 (Gift of Dr. Takeshima Takuichi)
Pagoda, Qixia Temple, Dated 1918 (Gift of Dr. Takeshima Takuichi)
Stone Gate, Changling Tomb, By Takeshima Takuichi, Dated 1931 (Gift of Dr. Takeshima Takuichi)

  
Decorative Designs of the Ainu People
Room 16  January 2, 2016 (Sat) - April 10, 2016 (Sun)

This display features elaborate designs the Ainu people used to decorate their garments and daily utensils. Garment designs were rendered from pieces of cotton cloth and dyed embroidery. Wooden objects such as trays, makiri knife mountings, and ritual quivers were decorated with minutely carved patterns. Women decorated using cloth and needles, and men engraved designs with makiri knives. The Ainu designs featured include whorl patterns called morew and brace-like patterns known as ayus.
The Ainu people held rituals and dances wearing garments and holding objects decorated with these designs.

Current exhibit includes:
Hat, Provenance unknown, 19th century (Gift of Mr. Katayama Naoto, On exhibit through February 14, 2016)
Earrings,
Hokkaido Ainu(Abuta, Abashiri), 19th century
Necklace,
Hokkaido Ainu, 19th century (Gift of Mr. Tokugawa Yorisada)
Smoking Set,
Sakhalin Ainu, 19th century (Gift of Mr. Tokugawa Yorisada, On exhibit from February 16, 2016)
Coat,
Hokkaido Ainu, 19th century (Gift of Mr. Tokugawa Yorisada, On exhibit through February 14, 2016)
Chiukaukapu ("What we sewed") Coat,
Hokkaido Ainu (Abuta), Formerly used by Chief Ikashi Wakka, Edo period-Meiji era, 19th century (Gift of Mr. Tokugawa Yorisada, On exhibit from February 16, 2016)

  
Conservation and Restoration
Room 17  April 15, 2014 (Tue) - April 10, 2016 (Sun)

>> detailed information
The preservation and conservation of cultural properties are essential aspects of our Museum's mission. From this point of view, this room features object research and examination, environmental maintenance of storage and exhibition rooms, and conservation procedures applied in accordance to materials and conditions of the objects.


 

  
Modern Art
Room 18  January 2, 2016 (Sat) - February 21, 2016 (Sun)

This gallery features paintings and sculptures from the Meiji to Taisho period. Since it first opened in 1872 as the exposition venue of the Ministry of Education, Tokyo National Museum has collected important artworks that signify the development of modern Japanese art. The exhibit consists of selected works from the collection.

Current exhibit includes:
Stone Buddha of Datong, By Maeda Seison, Dated 1938 (Gift of the artist)
Portrait of Reiko, By Kishida Ryusei, Dated 1921 (Important Cultural Property)
Woman, By Ogiwara Morie, Mold: 1910, cast: 2010
Hawk, Ivory, By Kaneda Kenjiro, 1892 (Gift of Japan Delegate Office for World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago)
Hoken Style Sword Mounting, Dragon and cloud design on nashiji lacquer ground, By Kano Natsuo, Dated 1873
Large Flower Vase, "Oeyama (scene of goblin hunting)" design, By Yokoyama Takashige and Yokoyama Yazaemon, Dated 1872 (Gift of the Bureau for the Vienna World Exposition)
Ornamental Jar, Pair of phoenixes design in overglaze enamel and gold, By Kinkozan Sobei Vll, Dated 1892 (Gift of Japan Delegate Office for World's Columbian Exposition)

  
Modern Art
Room T4  October 6, 2015 (Tue) - May 7, 2017 (Sun)

This exhibition features two bronze sculptures in connection with the modern Japanese artworks on display in room 18: one by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin, who had great influence in Japan, and another by Ogiwara Morie, a pioneering artist in the field of modern Japanese sculpture.

Current exhibit includes:
Eve, By Auguste Rodin, 19th century

*This room will be closed for prepare exhibition on Monday, March 14 - Tuesday, March 22, 2016.

  
Education Center: Education Space
Room 19  April 15, 2014 (Tue) - April 10, 2016 (Sun)

Designing at TNM
Exploring The TNM Collection
Making at TNM
Searching for National Treasures at TNM
Touching TNM

  
Room 19  September 25, 2015 (Fri) - March 13, 2016 (Sun)

The example artwork is the hanging scroll with pink flowers from Red and White Hibiscuses (designated as a National Treasure), a work by the Chinese court painter Li Di in the Southern Song dynasty in 1197 (Qing Yuan 3). Through the reproduction of this artwork, faithfully recreated in stages, this display describes how the painting was completed.
In addition, to demonstrate the properties of painting materials, coloring that uses two different types of material has been recreated. Visitors are encouraged to deepen their understanding about the diversity of paints in Asian painting by comparing artworks in which areas are divided by types of painting material.