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Change of Exhibits, Regular Exhibitions: Starting from September 18, 2019 (Wed)

Regular exhibitions at Tokyo National Museum are rotated almost every week. This page provides the latest information on the change of exhibits.
* Some works are exhibited for a longer period of time.

Honkan

  
Lacquerware
Room 12  September 18, 2019 (Wed) - December 8, 2019 (Sun)

Features maki-e works from 12th century to 19th century. The exhibit shows the history and beauty of maki-e, a unique lacquerwork method that developed in Japan.

Current exhibition includes:
Cosmetic Box with Cypress-Fan Crests, Kamakura period, 13th century (Important Cultural Property)
Writing Box with a Brushwood Fence and Ivy, By Koma Kyūi, Edo period, 17th century (Important Cultural Property)
Lamp Stand, Hosoge flower design in mother of pearl inlay and Heijin maki-e lacquer, Heian period, 12th century (National Treasure, Lent by Daichōjuin Temple, Iwate)
Sutra Box with the Moon and Peonies, Kamakura period, 13th–14th century (National Treasure, Lent by Saidaiji Temple, Nara)
Box for Monk's Robes with Squirrel's Foot Ferns and Arrowroot, Donated to temple in Nanbokucho period, 1342 (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Kongōbuji Temple, Wakayama)
Footed Chest with Suminoe Beach, Nanbokucho period, dated 1357 (Important Cultural Property)
Mirror Box with Paulownias, Bamboo, and Phoenixes, Muromachi period, 15th century (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Atsuta Shrine, Aichi)
Writing Box with a Bugaku Performer, Attributed to Hon'ami Kōetsu, Edo period, 17th century (Important Cultural Property)

  
Metalwork
Room 13  September 18, 2019 (Wed) - November 4, 2019 (Mon)

Decoration in Buddhism involves sumptuous representations of Buddhas, as well as ritual interiors of temple halls. The adornments used for this purpose are known collectively in Japanese as shogongu. This exhibition introduces Buddhist ritual implements such as containers for sarira, or literally, “Buddha’s relics,” together with items for esoteric Buddhist altars, and interior decor including ritual banners and pendent floral openwork ornaments. The works present an overview of multifarious metalwork techniques such as casting, carving, and forging.

Current exhibit includes:
Container from a Reliquary Set, Found at former site of Mishima Temple, Ōda, Ibaraki-shi, Osaka, Nara period, 8th century (Important Cultural Property, Gift of Mr. Hirano Sutejirō and Mr. Ōta Jisaburō)
Jar from a Reliquary Set, Found at former site of Mishima Temple, Ōda, Ibaraki-shi, Osaka, Nara period, 8th century (Important Cultural Property, Gift of Mr. Hirano Sutejirō and Mr. Ōta Jisaburō)
Box from a Reliquary Set, Found at former site of Mishima Temple, Ōda, Ibaraki-shi, Osaka, Nara period, 8th century (Important Cultural Property, Gift of Mr. Hirano Sutejirō and Mr. Ōta Jisaburō)
Box from a Reliquary Set, Found at former site of Mishima Temple, Ōda, Ibaraki-shi, Osaka, Nara period, 8th century (Important Cultural Property, Gift of Mr. Hirano Sutejirō and Mr. Ōta Jisaburō)
“Flower Garland” with Lotuses, Kamakura period, 13th century (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Kongōrinji Temple, Shiga)
“Flower Garland” with a Seed Syllable, Kamakura period, 13th century (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Nara National Museum)
“Flower Garland” with Lotuses, Muromachi period, 15th century (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Jinshōji Temple, Shiga)

  
Room 14  September 18, 2019 (Wed) - December 8, 2019 (Sun)

This exhibition showcases tea wares created at some of the major Japanese kilns—Bizen, Shigaraki, Iga, and Tanba—that are known for the production of unglazed ceramic wares.

  
Room 19  September 18, 2019 (Wed) - March 31, 2020 (Tue)

In traditional Asian painting, the paints were made from natural substances, such as minerals, plants, animals, and even insects. Depending on the base substances, the color tones and usability of the paints differed. Understanding the unique properties of each type of paint, as well as effective use and combination of different paints, allowed for increased variation in painted depictions. The National Treasure Red and White Cotton Rosemallow is an example of works in which the unique properties of the paints have been skillfully utilized. It is a pair of paintings created by the Chinese court painter Li Di in 1197, during the Southern Song dynasty. From this pair of hanging scroll paintings, the one depicting pink flowers has been reproduced based on research.

Toyokan

  
Chinese Painting
Room 8  September 18, 2019 (Wed) - October 27, 2019 (Sun)

Current exhibit includes:
The Nine Elders, By Ren Yi, China, Qing dynasty, dated 1883 (Gift of Dr. Hayashi Munetake)
Sweet Dream at Mount Luofu, By Yu Ming, China, Republic period, 20th century (Private collection)
Literary Gathering in Chengnan, By Yu Zhiding, China, Qing dynasty, 17th century (Gift of Mr. Takashima Kikujiro)

  
Chinese Calligraphy: The Development of Clerical Script
Room 8  September 18, 2019 (Wed) - October 27, 2019 (Sun)

Chinese script was first standardized during the reign of the Qin emperor (221–206 BC). This so-called seal script was replaced by the less complicated clerical script of the Eastern Han dynasty (25–220). From the Northern and Southern dynasties (439–589), clerical script was further simplified to what is now known as standard script, although it remained in use for memorial stones. During the reign of Emperor Xuanzong (712–756) and the Qing dynasty (1644–1912), clerical script briefly came back into fashion and became the subject of epigraphy.
In this exhibition we are currently displaying ink rubbings from the Eastern Han dynasty to the Tang dynasty (618–907) and works from various Qing-dynasty (1644–1912) scholars to explore the development of clerical script.

Current exhibit includes:
Inscription of the Scholar Lou Stele, China, Eastern Han dynasty, dated 174 (Gift of Mr. Takashima Kikujiro)
Writing after Stele Inscriptions by Zhang Qian and Shi Mensong, By He Shaoji, China, Qing dynasty, dated 1862
Inscription of the Yi Ying Stele, China, Eastern Han dynasty, dated 153 (Gift of Mr. Takashima Kikujiro)
Inscription of the Kong Xian Stele, China, Wei dynasty, dated 220
Inscription of the Monk Dazhi Stele, By Shi Weize, China, Tang dynasty, dated 736
Duilian in Clerical Script, By Xu Sangeng, China, Qing dynasty, dated 1880, (Gift of Mr. Aoyama San'u)

  
Chinese Literati
Room 8  September 18, 2019 (Wed) - October 27, 2019 (Sun)

The literati were people who devoted themselves to reading, calligraphy, painting, and other fine arts. In China, their way of life was traditionally held as an ideal. This exhibit recreates the studies of literati, where calligraphy and painting of China were born.

Current exhibit includes:
Display Shelf for Writing Tools and Materials, Qing dynasty, 19th century (Gift of Mr. Hirota Matsushige)
“Universal Love” in Running Script, By Sun Yat-sen, Republic period, 20th century