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Change of Exhibits, Regular Exhibitions: Starting from April 23, 2019 (Tue)

Regular exhibitions at Tokyo National Museum are rotated almost every week. This page provides the latest information on the change of exhibits.
* Some works are exhibited for a longer period of time.

Honkan

  
The Rise of Buddhism: Asuka–Nara period
Room 1  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - June 2, 2019 (Sun)

In the mid-6th century, Buddhism was officially introduced into Japan from the kingdom of Baekje on the southeastern coast of the Korean peninsula. Japanese culture made a remarkable progress with the adoption of Buddhism. This gallery features early Buddhist statues, sutras, reliquaries, and ritual implements from the Asuka and Nara periods.

Current exhibit includes:
Seated Nikko Bosatsu (Suryaprabha), Formerly owned by Kinrinji and Kosanji, Kyoto, Nara period, 8th century (Important Cultural Property)
Shibun kaihon Monastic Code of Conduct with Preface, Nara period, dated 768 (Gift of Mr. Hori Tatsu)
Ritual Objects Used to Consecrate Site of Kohfukuji Temple, Excavated from under altar of Main Hall at Kohfukuji, Nara, Nara period, 8th century (National Treasure)
Ritual Objects Used to Consecrate Site of Kohfukuji TempleEight-lobed Mirror with Design of Flowers and Paired Butterflies, Excavated from under altar of Main Hall at Kohfukuji, Nara, Nara period, 8th century (National Treasure)
Ritual Objects Used to Consecrate Site of Kohfukuji Temple, Excavated from under altar of Main Hall at Kohfukuji, Nara, Nara period, (8th century National Treasure)

  
Buddhist Art: Heian–Muromachi period
Room 3  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - June 2, 2019 (Sun)

Buddhist art is one of the major genres that define Japanese art. Many masterworks date from the late Heian period, a time characterized as classical in Japanese art history. After the Kamakura period, Buddhist art further developed in its materials, methods, and styles as Zen schools and other new Buddhist schools emerged, together with the influence from the Chinese arts. This exhibit features artworks from the Heian to Kamakura periods, when Buddhist art most flourished, adding siginificant objects from the Nanbokucho and periods.

Current exhibit includes:
Standing Bishamonten (Vaisravana), By Keisan, Kamakura period, dated 1271
Miroku (Maitreya) Mandala, Kamakura period, 13th century (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Reiunji, Tokyo)
Kokuzo Bosatsu (Akasagarbha), Kamakura period, 13th century (Important Cultural Property, Gift of Mr. Muto Sanji)
Hannya Bosatsu (Prajnaparamita), Kamakura period, 13th century (Important Cultural Property)
Buddhist Patriarchs, By Gensho (1146-1222), Heian period, 12th century (Important Cultural Property)
Great Perfection of Wisdom Sutra, Vol. 600Votive sutra of Abe Komizumaro, By Abe no Komizumaro, Heian period, dated 871 (Gift of Mr. Matsunaga Yasuzaemon)
Record of the Origin of Sarira (Buddhist relics) and Their Blessings, By Daikyu Shonen, Kamakura period, dated 1278 (Important Cultural Property)
Butterfly-shaped Kei Gong, Excavated at Miyabuchi, Matsumoto-shi, Nagano, Heian period, dated 1001 (Important Cultural Property, Gift of Mr. Takahashi Tamotsu)
Kei Gong, Lotus pond design, Excavated at Kinpusen, Tenkawa-mura, Yoshino-gun, Nara, Heian period, 12th century (Important Cultural Property)

  
Courtly Art: Heian–Muromachi period
Room 3  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - June 2, 2019 (Sun)

The courtiers were strongly involved in the arts through the Heian and Muromachi periods, their aesthetic tastes playing a great role in Japanese art history. Literature works such as waka poems and other calligraphy written by courtiers, and e-maki narrative picture scrolls displayed in this room with decorative art objects.

Current exhibit includes:
Detached Segment of Illustrated Scroll of Boy Sudhana's Pilgrimage to Fifty-five Deities: Monju Bosatsu (Manjusri), Heian period, 12th century (Important Cultural Property)
Detached Segment of Illustrated Scroll of Boy Sudhana's Pilgrimage to Fifty-five Deities: Fugen Bosatsu (Samantabhadra), Heian period, 12th century (Important Cultural Property)
Detached Segment of Inga kyo (Illustrated sutra of karma explained through Buddha's life), Nara period, 8th century

  
Zen and Ink Painting: Kamakura–Muromachi period
Room 3  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - June 2, 2019 (Sun)

This gallery features works by famous artists of the landscape-painting genre, along with famous works of bokuseki (calligraphy by Zen priests).

Current exhibit includes:
Verse of Praise Written on the Anniversary of Nan'in Kokushi's Death, By Seisetsu Shocho, Nanbokucho period, dated 1337
Flowers and Birds, With seal of “Moin”, Muromachi period, 16th century

  
Folding Screens and Sliding Door Paintings: Azuchi-Momoyama–Edo period
Room 7  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - May 19, 2019 (Sun)

This gallery is dedicated to the genre of shohei-ga, which includes mural paintings, fusuma paintings and byobu paintings. The room is especially designed for an effective display of grand-scale paintings.

Current exhibit includes:
Scenes from Eiga Monogatari By Tosa Mitsusuke (1675-1710) Edo period, 17th–18th century

  
Noh and Kabuki: Bugaku Costumes
Room 9  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - June 23, 2019 (Sun)

Bugaku is a ceremonial dance performed at temples, shrines, and the imperial court since ancient times. The art form entered Japan in the late 8th century from the Asian continent and gradually became more Japanese in style. In dances originally transmitted from China, red forms the underlying tone of the dancers’ robes. In dances from Korea, blue/green is dominant. In this exhibition, costumes worn in a Korean-style dance called Nasori and in a Chinese-style dance known as Ryo’o take center stage. The sophisticated colors and designs of these robes provide a glimpse into the refined culture and taste of the imperial court in ancient Japan.

Current exhibit includes:
Ryoto (Bugaku costume) for the Nasori Role, Paulownia arabesque and phoenix roundel design on green ground, Edo period, 19th century
Ryoto (Bugaku costume) for the Ryo'o Role, Cloud and dragon roundel design, Edo period, 19th century

  
Ukiyo-e and Fashion in the Edo Period: Fashion
Room 10  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - June 23, 2019 (Sun)

Introduces the fashion of the Edo period townspeople. Enjoy comparing with the ukiyo-e works exhibited in the same room.

Current exhibit includes:
Kosode (Garment with small wrist openings), Scoop net design on white figured satin ground, Edo period, 17th century
Ubugi (Garment for newborn baby), Shell design on light brown, plain weave silk ground, Edo period, 17th century
Kosode (Garment with small wrist openings)Clematis, thatched pavilion, and fence design on white figured satin ground, Edo period, 18th century
Inro (Medicine case), Peony and butterfly design in applique, Edo period, 19th century (Gift of Mr. Quincy A. Shaw)

  
Records of History
Room 15  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - June 16, 2019 (Sun)

The Tokyo National Museum holds many artworks and other materials that shine light on history, with the foundation of this collection consisting of materials inherited from the shogun’s government of the Edo period (1603–1868). From the time of the Museum’s establishment in 1872, this foundation was supplemented with additional materials collected through exhibitions and surveys of cultural properties. This gallery displays albums of natural science, a discipline that thrived in the Edo period, maps created in the Edo period and the following Meiji era, ink rubbings of calligraphy inscribed into stone and metal, and a variety of other historical materials. In addition, photographs from the late 19th and early 20th century, which show the people and scenery of the day, as well as expositions and cultural properties, are also shown periodically.

Current exhibit includes:
Map of Kyushu (Large-sized map)No. 10, By Ino Tadataka, Edo period, 19th century (Important Cultural Property)
Map of the Sekiyado'dori Takodo RoadMatsudo: Manmanji; Kogane: Hondoji, Nagareyamakashi, Kogane'ichinomaki, Formerly preserved at Asakusa Bunko Library, Edo period, dated 1806  (Important Cultural Property)

Toyokan

  
Art of the Western Regions
Room 3  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - June 2, 2019 (Sun)

This part introduces art of the Western Regions (Central Asia) from about the 1st to the 10th century, with a focus on Buddhist art. The highlight of this part is the rich variety of works with high artistic and historical significance.

Current exhibit includes:
Head of Bodhisattva, Kumtura Caves, ChinaOtani collection, Tang dynasty, 7th–8th century

  
Burials in China
Room 5  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - July 15, 2019 (Mon)

This part introduces burial items of tombs from about the 2nd century BC to the 8th century AD. Mingqi are models of various implements and equipment, such as cooking stoves, vehicles including carriages and oxcarts, and even toilets. Tomb figures are models of humans who served a master, such as servants and entertainers. The objects on display present the idealized lifestyle that people of this time entrusted to mingqi and tomb figures.

Current exhibit includes:
Model of Well, Green glaze
, China, Eastern Han dynasty, 2nd–3rd century (Gift of Dr. Yokogawa Tamisuke)
Ewer, Flower design; yellow glaze with applied ornaments in underglaze iron pigment, Changsha ware, China, Tang dynasty, 9th century (Private collection)
Bowl, Yellow glaze with design in underglaze green and iron pigment, Changsha ware, China, Attributed provenance: Iriomote-jima, Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, Tang dynasty, 9th century (Private collection)
Woman, Three-color glaze, China, Tang dynasty, 8th century (Gift of Mr. Suzuki Eiichi)
Tomb Guardian, Three-color glaze, China, Tang dynasty, 7th–8th century (Gift of Dr. Yokogawa Tamisuke)

  
Room 5  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - July 15, 2019 (Mon)

This thematic exhibition introduces the history of the collection and research of Chinese celadon porcelain at the Tokyo National Museum.

  
Chinese Calligraphy: Chidu Letters and Writings after Letters
Room 8  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - June 16, 2019 (Sun)

A chidu is a type of Chinese letter. In the Northern and Southern dynasty (439–589), the Southern-dynasty emperors revered the calligraphy of Wang Xizhi and Wang Xianzhi (the Two Wangs), who were calligraphers in the Eastern Jin dynasty (317–420). The emperors collected letters and other documents written in refined running and cursive scripts, thus beginning the first stage of a history of calligraphy centered on the works of Wang Xizhi. From the Song dynasty (960–1279) onward, many copybooks of calligraphy were compiled, starting most notably with the calligraphy compendium, Chun hua ge tie (992), which focused on the calligraphy of the Two Wangs. Through these copybooks, the letters of the Two Wangs and other calligraphers have been appreciated and used as model calligraphy up to the present day. This exhibition features chidu letters from the Song dynasty to the Qing dynasty, as well as Ming- and Qing-dynasty examples of writings after letters in copybooks.

Exhibit includes:
Letters in Cursive Script, By Wen Xin, Ming dynasty, dated 1368 (Gift of Mr. Takashima Kikujiro)
Letter to Wang Shen, By Zhao Lingzhi, Northern Song dynasty, 11th–12th century (Gift of Mr. Takashima Kikujiro)
Letters in Cursive Script, By Zhu Xi, Southern Song dynasty, 12th century (Gift of Mr. Takashima Kikujiro)
Writing after a Letter of Liu Gongquan, By Wang Duo, Ming dynasty, dated 1647 (Gift of Mr. Takashima Kikujiro)
Writing after Calligraphy by Wang Xizhi, By Fushan, Qing dynasty, 17th century (Gift of Mr. Takashima Kikujiro)
Writing after Wang Xizhi's Sixiang tie Copybook, By Bao Shichen, Qing dynasty, 19th century (Gift of Mr. Takashima Kikujiro)

  
Chinese Literati
Room 8  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - June 16, 2019 (Sun)

The literati were people who devoted themselves to reading, calligraphy, painting, and other fine arts. In China, their way of life was traditionally held as an ideal. This exhibit recreates the studies of literati, where calligraphy and painting of China were born.

Current exhibit includes:
Inkstone with Hollow UndersideOrchid Pavilion design, Formerly owned by Mr. Aoyama San'u, Ming dynasty, 14th–17th century (Gift of Mr. Aoyama Keiji)
Five Characters for Plaque in Clerical Script, By Yi Bingshou, Qing dynasty, dated 1812 (Gift of Mr. Takashima Kikujiro)

  
Polished Stone Tools and Metal Tools of Korea
Room 10  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - October 20, 2019 (Sun)

This part highlights Korean polished stone tools and metal objects that had a great influence on Japan's Yayoi culture.

Current exhibit includes:
Crown, Attributed provenance: Gyeongsangnam-do, Korea, Three Kingdoms period (Gaya), 5th century (Important Art Object, Gift of the Ogura Foundation)
Polished Stone Sickle, Excavated at Buyeo, Korea, Bronze Age, 10th–4th century BC (Gift of Mr. Sakenobu Kyokusho)
Bronze Dagger, Excavated at Ochon-ri, Pyongyang, Korea, Early Iron Age, 2nd century BC
Bronze Ornamental Fitting, With animals, Attributed provenance: Gyeongju, Korea, Early Iron Age-Proto Three Kingdoms period, 3rd–1st century BC (Important Art Object, Gift of the Ogura Foundation)

  
The Rises and Falls of Kings in Korea
Room 10  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - October 20, 2019 (Sun)

This part features the prosperity of kings in the Three Kingdoms period (4th century–676) in Korea, through works including items of metalwork. The diverse designs of the objects are evidence of the prosperity of the kings.

Current exhibit includes:
Earring, Three Kingdoms period (Silla), Korea, 6th century (Gift of the Ogura Foundation)
Headgear, With design in openwork, Attributed provenance: Changnyeong, Korea, Three Kingdoms period, 6th century (Important Cultural Property, Gift of the Ogura Foundation)

  
Korean Ceramics
Room 10  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - October 20, 2019 (Sun)

This part introduces Korean ceramics from the Proto–Three Kingdoms period (1st century BC–3rd century AD) to the Joseon dynasty(1392–1910).

Current exhibit includes:
Cylindrical Stand, Excavated from Yangsan Bubuchong Tomb, Korea, Three Kingdoms period (Silla), start of 6th century
Vase, Celadon glaze with carved lotus arabesque design, Korea, Goryeo dynasty, 12th century
Jar in Shape of Rice BaleBuncheong ware; fish design in underglaze iron, Korea, Joseon dynasty, 15th–16th century (Private collection)
Beveled Jar, White porcelain, Joseon dynasty, Korea, 18th century (Private collection)
Jar, Crane and tortoise design in underglaze blue, Korea, Joseon dynasty, 19th century (Gift of Dr. Yokogawa Tamisuke)
Equestrian Figurine, Korea, Three Kingdoms period (Silla), 5th–6th century (Important Art Object, Gift of the Ogura Foundation)
Transverse Flute, Unified Silla dynasty, Korea, 8th century (Gift of the Ogura Foundation)
Horse-shaped Vessel, Attributed provenance: Changnyeong, Korea, Three Kingdoms period (Silla), 5th century (Important Art Object, Gift of the Ogura Foundation)
Water Fowl-shaped Vessel, Korea, Three Kingdoms period (Silla), 5th century (Important Art Object, Gift of the Ogura Foundation)
Double-mouthed Vessel with Wheels, Attributed provenance: Changnyeong, Korea, Three Kingdoms period (Silla), 5th century (Important Art Object, Gift of the Ogura Foundation)
House-shaped VesselStoneware, Three Kingdoms period (Silla), 5th–6th century (Important Art Object, Gift of the Ogura Foundation)
BowlCeladon glaze, Goryeo dynasty, Korea, 10th century
BowlWhite porcelain, Goryeo dynasty, Korea, 11th century (Gift of Mr. Kudo Yoshiro)

  
Archaeology of India and Southeast Asia
Room 12  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - April 19, 2020 (Sun)

The excavated pottery and metal wares exhibited in this part clearly show the prosperity of cultures with rich regional characteristics in ancient India and Southeast Asia.

Current exhibit includes:
Human-shaped Object, Attributed provenance: Uttar Pradesh, India, Copper Hoard culture, ca. 1500 BC
Bronze Drum, Attributed provenance: northern Thailand, 6th–5th century BC (Lent by Ithe demitsu Museum of Arts)
Bronze Drum, Northern Thailand, 15th–17th century, Gift of Prince Damrong, Thailand

  
Ethnic Cultures of Asia: The Sea People of Taiwan: The Traditional Culture of the Tao
Room 13  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - July 21, 2019 (Sun)

Orchid Island is situated off the southeastern coast of the main island of Taiwan. The ethnic group of Tao (Yami) people, who live on this island, are said to have come across the sea from the northern Philippines. This exhibit presents the prayers and wisdom of the Tao people who have lived together with the sea on their isolated island.

Current exhibit includes:
Model of Fishing Boat, Orchid Island, Taitung County, Taiwan, Second half of 19th-early 20th century
Armor, Taiwan, Second half of 19th–early 20th century (Gift of Mr. Yamato Iwataro)
Helmet, Taiwan, Second half of 19th–early 20th century (Gift of Mr. Yamato Iwataro)

The Gallery of Horyuji Treasures

  
Wooden and Lacquer Works
Room 4  April 23, 2019 (Tue) - June 23, 2019 (Sun)

Wooden and lacquered objects include various examples of Buddhist ritual implements, furnishings, musical instruments, stationery, measuring tools, and arms & armor, which range in date from the 7th to the 17th century. Among these are notable pieces from the 8th century like the Bamboo Cabinet, which was donated by the famous Hôryû-ji priest Gyôshin, and a sutra box decorated with marquetry that shows the beautiful grain patterns of its jinkó wood. The Seven-stringed Zither is also valuable for its ink inscription, which tells us it was produced in China's Sichuan Province in 724. The inscriptions on the pieces of incense wood in this collection also have revealed important facts about the involvement of Persians in the trade of such wood. Through these works one can not only see the culture of Japanese decorative art but can also get a sense of the cultural exchanges that occurred within East Asia centuries ago.

Including:
Box, Design of flowers, butterflies, and birds in gold and silver paint, Nara period, 8th century (Important Cultural Property)
Needle CaseWith bachiru, Nara period, 8th century (Important Cultural Property)