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Change of Exhibits, Regular Exhibitions: Starting from February 23, 2021 (Tue)

Regular exhibitions at Tokyo National Museum are rotated almost every week. This page provides the latest information on the change of exhibits.
* Some works are exhibited for a longer period of time.

Japanese Gallery (Honkan)

  
Room 10  February 23, 2021 (Tue) - March 14, 2021 (Sun)

Prints and paintings called ukiyo–e were the first genre of art enjoyed by common people on a large scale. Economic growth contributed to the creation of this genre in the 17th century. As living standards improved, common people developed an urban culture that was passionate about trends, fashion, and entertainment.

At first, ukiyo–e depicted the celebrities of the day, especially actors of the kabuki theater and courtesans of the pleasure quarters (the legal brothel district). The subject matter later expanded to include topics like seasonal festivals, travel spots, and landscapes.Techniques for making ukiyo–e also changed over time. Early ukiyo–e were painted by hand. Artisans later started carving images into blocks of wood and using these blocks to print ukiyo–e in large numbers. These black–and–white prints were much more affordable. As carving and printing techniques were refined, prints a brilliant range of colors became possible.

  
Room 14  February 23, 2021 (Tue) - March 21, 2021 (Sun)

Many families in Japan display elaborate dolls on March 3 for the annual Doll Festival. These dolls, called hina, represent parents’ wishes for their daughters to grow up into healthy and happy adults. Some hina dolls, especially the historic examples on display here, show remarkable artistry and reflect a long-established preference in Japan for small yet intricately crafted objects.

Asian Gallery (Toyokan)

  
Room 5  February 23, 2021 (Tue) - June 27, 2021 (Sun)

This gallery introduces burial goods from about the 2nd century BC to the 8th century AD. During this period, the aristocracy and ruling elites were buried in tomb mounds along with numerous items meant to ensure their comfort in the next life, such as miniature models of daily goods (mingqi) and tomb figures shaped like servants or other people to care for them after death. The miniature models are often related to livestock or agriculture and give clues about the dietary practices of people living during this period. Visitors will also have the opportunity to see tomb figures from the Han dynasty (206 BC–220 AD) and earthenware decorated in the renowned "three-color glaze" (sancai) of the Tang dynasty (618–907).