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Admiration of Ceramics from South China in Japan

Admiration of Ceramics from South China in Japan / Japanese Gallery (Honkan) Room 14   December 21, 2021 (Tue) - February 20, 2022 (Sun)

 Image of "Jar with Five LugsMing dyansty, 16th–17th century" 
Jar with Five Lugs
Ming dyansty, 16th–17th century

For over 1,000 years, from the late 10th to the early 20th century, ceramics for both local use and export have been produced in what are now Fujian and Guangdong provinces. The kilns in this area of South China were privately owned, producing ceramics with a robust and casual quality.

In Japan, the upper classes used these ceramics in daily life and for ceremonial preparations of powdered and leaf tea. Inspired by these ceramics, potters in 18th-century Kyoto began reproducing them at their own kilns.

This exhibition looks at the allure of these ceramics from South China and explores how they influenced the aesthetic tastes of people in Japan.

 Major works in this exhibition
* Works listed below are in the TNM Collection unless otherwise indicated.
 Major works in this exhibition
* Works listed below are in the TNM Collection unless otherwise indicated.
Jar with Five Lugs, China, Ming dyansty, 16th–17th century
Tenmoku Tea Bowl, China, Yuan–Ming dynasty, 14th–15th century (Gift of Mr. Hirota Matsushige)
Water Jar with Figures, Zhangzhou ware, China, Previously owned by Kagata Kan'ichirō, Ming dynasty, 17th century (Previously owned by the Kagata clan)
Bowl with Peonies, Guangzhou ware, Previously owned by Okano Shigezō and Hosokawa Moritatsu, Northern Song dynasty, 11th–12th century (Important Art Object)
Tea Cups with Poems, By Aoki Mokubei, Edo period, 1824

 

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