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Performing Arts

"Performing Arts"

Japanese Gallery (Honkan) Room 9  July 21, 2020 (Tue) - August 16, 2020 (Sun)

  
Haori (Kabuki costume), Target and arrow design on light green satin ground, Formerly used by Bando Mitsue, Edo period, 19th century (Gift of Ms. Takagi Kiyo)

Diverse performing arts flourished in Japan through the support of different social classes. A dance called bugaku was the main performance art of the imperial court in the Heian period (794–1192). It was based on dances introduced from China and Korea, and performed on special occasions like banquets.

The official performing art of samurai lords was noh. Early in its history, the actor and playwright Ze'ami (1363?–1443) developed noh into a subtle and elegant art form. Its plays often feature restless spirits or demons, who eventually attain salvation. Actors still perform these plays with chants and dances, wearing stylized masks and richly decorated costumes.

In contrast, kabuki theater was mainly enjoyed by common people in the Edo period (1603–1868). Actors did not use masks, but wore makeup and costumes with innovative designs. Many kabuki plays are inspired by historical or domestic events, captivating audiences with bold dialogue and movement.
 

Major Work(s) on Exhibit 3 results
Designation Name Amount Creation Excavation Period Acquisition Ownership Comment
_MD_RECOMMEND ”Haori” (Kabuki costume), Target and arrow design on light green satin ground Formerly used by Bando Mitsue Edo period, 19th century Gift of Ms. Takagi Kiyo I-2066
_MD_RECOMMEND "Kitsuke" (Kabuki costume), Trefoil "myoga" ginger crests on green satin ground Formerly used by Bando Mitsue Edo period, 19th century Gift of Ms. Takagi Kiyo I-2067
_MD_RECOMMEND Furisode (Garment with long hanging sleeves), Stream, flowering plant and fans on red figured satin Showa period, 20th century I-3590