Calligraphy of the Qing Dynasty: Deng Shiru, Bao Shichen, and Wu Xizai

"Calligraphy of the Qing Dynasty: Deng Shiru, Bao Shichen, and Wu Xizai"

Asian Gallery (Toyokan) Room 8  June 9, 2015 (Tue) - August 2, 2015 (Sun)

  
Writing in Imitation of Yu Xin's Rhapsody on the Small Garden in Running Script (detail), By Wu Xizai, Qing dynasty, 19th century (Gift of Mr. Aoyama San'u)

Around the end of the 18th century in the Qing dynasty (1616–1912), developments in “Evidential Learning,” which emphasized the need for objective evidence, stimulated the flourishing of the “Epigraphy Movement,” or the study of inscriptions on ancient bronze vessels and steles. Meanwhile, calligraphers of the “Stele School,” who were influenced by these inscriptions, brought significant change upon long-running trends in calligraphy.
This exhibition features three calligraphers of the Stele School who were connected through master-pupil relationships. Foremost is Deng Shiru, who made great achievements despite never serving as a government official, Bao Shichen (1775–1855), who excelled not only as a calligrapher but also as a theorist, and Wu Xizai (1799–1870), who infused his calligraphy with a delicate sensibility while lived in honest poverty.

Current exhibit includes:
Writing after Cui Ziyu's Mottoes in Clerical Script, By Deng Shiru, Qing dynasty, dated 1802 (Private collection)
Writing after Bai's Record of the Thatched Hall in Seal Script, By Deng Shiru, Qing dynasty, dated 1804 (Private collection)
Poems in Regular Script, By Bao Shichen, Qing dynasty, 18th-19th century
Writing after Zhang Hua's Poems in Clerical Script, By Wu Xizai, Qing dynasty, 19th century (Gift of Mr. Aoyama San'u)