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Splendid and Refined - Imari Ware and Kyoto Ware Ceramics

  • Image of "Left: Dish, Moon and rabbit in underglaze blue, Imari Ware, Tokyo National Museum  Right: Set of Five Mukozuke Dishes, Tatsuta River in overglaze enamels, Kenzan Ware, MIHO MUSEUM, Shiga"

    Left: Dish, Moon and rabbit in underglaze blue, Imari Ware, Tokyo National Museum
    Right: Set of Five Mukozuke Dishes, Tatsuta River in overglaze enamels, Kenzan Ware, MIHO MUSEUM, Shiga

    Splendid and Refined - Imari Ware and Kyoto Ware Ceramics

    Hyokeikan : October 4, 2005 (Tue) - December 4, 2005 (Sun)

    Enjoy the development and appeal of Imari and Kyoto wares, which represent the very best of Edo period ceramics.

 General Information
Period Tuesday, October 4 - Sunday, December 4,2005
Venue Hyokeikan, Tokyo National Museum (Ueno Park)
Hours 9:30 am. - 5:00 pm.
Fridays until 8:00 pm
(last entry 30 minutes before closing)
Closed Mondays (Except for Monday, October 10, 2005; closed Tuesday, October 11, 2005 instead)
Admissions Adult 1,300 (1,200/1,100) yen
University/High-school students 900 (800/700) yen
Junior high-school students and below admission free
* Prices shown in ( ) indicate advance-discount/group (more than 20 persons) tickets.
* Persons with a disability are allowed free entry with one companion. Valid identification requested upon entry.
 Same-day discount for the special exhibitions "Splendid and Refined: Imari Ware and Kyoto Ware Ceramics" and "HOKUSAI"
A 100-yen discount applies for either of the special exhibitions when both are visited on the same day. The admission ticket for the first exhibition visited on the day must be shown upon purchase of the ticket to the second exhibition.
Advance sales From September 2, 2005 at JR East Japan stations, Ticket PIA, Lawson Tickets, e-plus (e+), CN Playguides, Family Mart, Sankusu, Seven Eleven, JTB, etc.
Access 10 minutes' walk from JR Ueno Station (Park exit) and Uguisudani Station
15 minutes' walk from Keisei Ueno Station and Tokyo Metro Ueno Station and Nezu station.
Organizers Tokyo National Museum, Yomiuri Shimbun
With the Cooperation of JR East Japan
General Inquiries +81-3-3822-1111
Exhibition Homepage http://info.yomiuri.co.jp/event/ (Japanese)
The website has closed with the end of the exhibition.
 Related lecture (in Japanese)
  Commemorative lecture
1. Ninsei's Tea Leaf Jar
by Oka Yoshiko (Associate Professor, Otemae University)
Auditorium, Heiseikan
Saturday, October 22, 2005 at 13:30 - 15:00
2. The Appeal of Imari Ceramics
by Arakawa Masaaki (Curator, Idemitsu Museum of Arts)
Auditorium, Heiseikan
Saturday, November 19, 2005 at 13:30 - 15:00
  Other Exhibitions
Special Feature: Buddha Head - National Treasure from Kohfukuji
Room T5, Honkan, Wednesday, September 21 - Sunday, October 16, 2005
HOKUSAI
Heiseikan, Tuesday, October 25 - Sunday, December 4, 2005
 About the Exhibition
I. The Splendor of Imari Wares
 
In the 1610s, Imari ware evolved as the first porcelain in Japan. Aiming at mass production, it developed in various styles according to market (domestic or export) and taste.
Dish, Moon and rabbit in underglaze blue
  I-1. The Birth of Porcelain — Early Imari Wares

Dish

Moon and rabbit in underglaze blue
Imari Ware
Edo period, ca. 1620 - 1640
Tokyo National Museum
Large Bowl, Butterfly and peonies in overglaze enamels
  I-2. Applying color — Kokutani-style Imari

Large Bowl

Butterfly and peonies in overglaze enamels
Imari Ware, Kokutani Type
Edo period, ca. 1640 - 1660
Private Collection
(Important Cultural Property)
Pair of Bottles, Autumn grasses in overglaze enamels
  I-3. Reaching Out to the World (1) — Kakiemon-style Imari

Pair of Bottles

Autumn grasses in overglaze enamels
Imari Ware, Kakiemon Type
Edo period, ca. 1670 - 1700
Private Collection
Dish, Pine tree and boat in overglaze enamels
  I-4. Reaching Out to the World (2), Then Domestically — Kinrande

Dish

Pine tree and boat in overglaze enamels
Imari Ware
Edo period, dated 1693
Private Collection
Large Dish with Three Legs, Chain pattern in overglaze enamels
  I-5. Mastery of Refinement — Nabeshima

Large Dish with Three Legs

Chain pattern in overglaze enamels
Nabeshima Ware
Edo period, 18th century
Private Collection
II. The Elegance of Kyoto Wares
 
The spirit of Kyoto ware, in contrast to Imari, is the detailed elegance and art pursued by master craftsmen. Often the works are distinguished by the masters' names, such as Ninsei and Kenzan.
Tea Leaf Jar, Moon and plum tree in overglaze enamels The back
  II-1. Form and Design — Ninsei

Tea Leaf Jar

Moon and plum tree in overglaze enamels
Ninsei Ware
Edo period, 17th century
Tokyo National Museum
(Important Cultural Property)
Tea Bowl, Narcissus in underglaze iron brown
  Tea Bowl
Narcissus in underglaze iron brown
Ninsei Ware
Edo period, mid 17th century
Ten'neiji, Kyoto
Bowl, Maple leaves in overglaze enamels and openwork
  II-2. From Painting into Ceramics — Kenzan

Bowl

Maple leaves in overglaze enamels and openwork
Kenzan Ware
Edo period, first half of 18th century
Private Collection
Vase in Shape of a <i>Sho</i> Insturment
  II-3. The Modeling of Elegance — Kokiyomizu

Vase in Shape of a Sho Instrument

Decoration in overglaze enamels
Kokiyomizu
Edo period, 18th century
Kyoto Prefectural Library and Archives
Set of Sencha Tea Ceremony Utensils
  II-4. Masters of the Late Edo Period — Eisen, Mokubei, Dohachi, and Hozen

Set of Sencha Tea Ceremony Utensils

By Aoki Mokubei
Edo period, first half of 19th century
Tokyo National Museum