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Honkan

The original Main Gallery (designed by the British architect Josiah Conder) was severely damaged in the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923. In contrast to western style of the original structure, the design of the present Honkan by Watanabe Jin is the more eastern "Emperor's Crown Style." Construction began in 1932, and the building was opened in 1938.
24 exhibition rooms on two floors provide a thorough introduction into Japanese art: "Highlights of Japanese Art" on the second floor introduces the development of Japanese art from Jomon through to the Edo period in a chronological manner, and genre galleries presenting specific rooms displaying ceramics, swords, lacquerwares, sculptures, modern decorative arts as well as the material culture of Ainu and Ryukyu are located on the first floor.

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Rooms 1 - 10 (Highlights of Japanese Art) and RoomT1, T2 and The Prince Takamado Collection Room on the 2nd floor of Honkan will be closed for exhibition preparation on Friday, December 16, 2016 - Sunday, January 1, 2017


Special Feature

  
 January 2, 2017 (Mon) - January 15, 2017 (Sun)

Features selected masterpieces from our collection to celebrate the new year.

2nd floor "Highlights of Japanese Art"

  
The Dawn of Japanese Art: Jomon, Yayoi and Kofun periods
Room 1  May 31, 2016 (Tue) - December 11, 2016 (Sun)

The Jomon culture began around 12,000 years ago. Earthenware vessels of this age with various motifs and styles are the starting point of "Highlights of Japanese Art." In the Yayoi period (450 B.C.- A.D. 250), pottery with a simplistic yet refined beauty and dotaku bell-shaped bronzes were prominent. Typical objects from the Kofun period (A.D. 250-600), such as haji, sue wares and haniwa figurines, as well as mirrors, arms and armor, saddlery, and accessory, which expresses the essence of metal and glass craftsmanship, are also featured.

Current exhibit includes:
Dancing People, Haniwa (Terracotta Tomb Figurine), Excavated from Nohara Tumulus, Miyawaki, Nohara, Kumagaya-shi, Saitama, Kofun period, 6th century
Haniwa (Terracotta tomb figurine), Woman in full dress, Excavated from Yokotsuka, Toyoshiro-cho, Isezaki-shi, Gunma, Kofun period, 6th century (Important Cultural Property)
Dogu (Clay figurine), With goggle-shaped eyes, Excavated from Rokugoishinadate, Misato-cho, Akita, Jomon period, 1000 - 400BC,
Jar, Excavated from Takakura-cho, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi, Yayoi period, 1st-3rd century (Important Cultural Property, Gift of Mr. Tokugawa Yorisada)
Footed Long-necked Jar, Sue ware, Excavated from Kaniana Tumulus, Toshi-cho, Toba-shi, Mie, Kofun (Asuka) period, 7th century (Important Cultural Property, Gift of Mr. Kawahara Shozo)

  
The Rise of Buddhism: Asuka - Nara period
Room 1  November 1, 2016 (Tue) - December 11, 2016 (Sun)

In the mid-6th century, Buddhism was officially introduced into Japan from the kingdom of Baekje on the southeastern coast of the Korean peninsula. Japanese culture made a remarkable progress with the adoption of Buddhism. This gallery features early Buddhist statues, sutras, reliquaries, and ritual implements from the Asuka and Nara periods.

Current exhibit includes:
Seated Bosatsu (Bodhisattva) with One Leg Pendent, Excavated from Mount Nachi, Nachikatsu'ura-cho, Wakayama, Asuka period, 7th century (Gift of Mr. Kitamata Tomeshiro and others)
Daihodo daijikkyo
Sutra, Vol. 10", Bosatsu nenbutsu zanmai bun" Section, Nara period, 8th century (Gift of Mr. Matsunaga Yasuzaemon)
Gigaku Mask, Suiko-ju type,
Nara period, 8th century (Gift of Mr. Mitsui Takahiro)
Ritual Objects Used to Consecrate Site of Kohfukuji Temple,
Excavated from under altar of Main Hall at Kohfukuji, Nara, Nara period, 8th century (National Treasure)
Bowl,
Nara period, 8th century (Important Cultural Property)

  
Record of the Poetry Contest at the Palace of the Empress in the Kampyo Era
Room 2  November 15, 2016 (Tue) - December 11, 2016 (Sun)

This handscroll records a poetry contest held by Empress Dowager Hanshi, who was the mother of Emperor Uda (867–931), during the Kampyo era (889–98) in the Heian period. Poetry contests were social events in which poets were divided into two teams, and one contestant from each team composed a poem on the same theme to be judged. Those who attended this particular poetry contest included renowned poets such as Ki no Tsurayuki, and their poems were documented in the Shinsen man’yo shu poetry anthology.
This work is part of the Jikkanbon utaawase poetry anthology, which was compiled by order of Imperial Regent Fujiwara no Yorimichi (992–1074). With a number of additions and corrections in red and black, it is considered a draft rather than the final copy. It is said to have been originally owned by the Konoe clan, one of the five clans with lineages of regents, but it is now divided up and preserved by several families including the Konoe and Maeda, who run cultural entities – the Yomei Bunko and Maeda Ikutokukai, respectively – that preserve and manage cultural properties.
The Jikkanbon utaawase poetry anthology consists of handwriting by ten or more individuals. It includes handwriting identical to that found in the Koyagire segment of calligraphy, which is considered the pinnacle of the Heian-period kana-character calligraphy, indicating these two works were probably created around the same period. With its sophisticated, refined handwriting in kana characters, calligraphy on this handscroll serves as a model even today. Visitors are invited to view this accomplished handwriting and the beauty emanating from its fluidity to their hearts’ content.

  
Buddhist Art: Heian - Muromachi period
Room 3  November 1, 2016 (Tue) - December 11, 2016 (Sun)

Buddhist art is one of the major genres that define Japanese art. Many masterworks date from the late Heian period, a time characterized as classical in Japanese art history. After the Kamakura period, Buddhist art further developed in its materials, methods, and styles as Zen schools and other new Buddhist schools emerged, together with the influence from the Chinese arts. This exhibit features artworks from the Heian to Kamakura periods, when Buddhist art most flourished, adding siginificant objects from the Nanbokucho and Muromachi periods.

Current exhibit includes:
Enma Ten (Yama) Mandala, Kamakura period, 13th century (Important Cultural Property, Private collection)
Twelve Devas: Fu Ten (Vayu),
Kamakura period, 14th century (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Saimyoji, Shiga)
Detached Segment of Illustrated Scroll of Legends about the Origin of Yuzu Nenbutsu Buddhism,
Kamakura period, 14th century (Important Art Object)
Detached Segment of Illustrated Scroll of Legends about the Origin of Yuzu Nenbutsu Buddhism,
Formerly owned by Mr. Hashimoto Tatsujiro, Nanbokucho period, 14th century (Important Art Object)
Plaque with Hairline Engraving of Zao Gongen,
Excavated from Kinpusen, Tenkawa-mura, Yoshino-gun, Nara, Heian period, dated 1001 (National Treasure, Lent by Nishiarai daishi Soujiji, Tokyo)
Bussetsu kogi homon kyo
Sutra, From the Nanatsudera issai kyo compilation, Heian period, 12th century (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Nanatsudera, Aichi)
Lotus Sutra, Hoben hon
chapter; known as "Chikubujima kyo", Heian period, 11th century (National Treasure)
Hokyoin darani kyo
Sutra, Heian period, 12th century (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Kongoji, Osaka)

  
Courtly Art: Heian - Muromachi period
Room 3  November 1, 2016 (Tue) - December 11, 2016 (Sun)

The courtiers were strongly involved in the arts through the Heian and Muromachi periods, their aesthetic tastes playing a great role in Japanese art history. Literature works such as waka poems and other calligraphy written by courtiers, and e-maki narrative picture scrolls are displayed in this room with decorative art objects.

Current exhibit includes:
Illustrated Scroll of Artisans' Poetry Contest at Tohokuin Temple, Kamakura period, 14th century (Important Cultural Property)
Water Dropper in Shape of Teapot, Clam design,
Muromachi period, 15th century (Gift of Mr. Watanabe Toyotaro and Mr. Watanabe Masayuki)

  
Zen and Ink Painting: Kamakura - Muromachi period
Room 3  November 1, 2016 (Tue) - December 11, 2016 (Sun)

This gallery features works by famous artists of the landscape-painting genre, along with famous works of bokuseki (calligraphy by Zen priests).

Current exhibit includes:
Landscape, By Gakuo Zokyu, Muromachi period, 15th century (Important Cultural Property, Gift of Mr. Okazaki Masaya)
Monju Bosatsu (Manjusri),
By Reisai; inscription by Ryoko Shinkei, Muromachi period, 15th century (Important Cultural Property)
Landscapes of the Four Seasons,
Attributed to Shubun, Muromachi period, 15th century (Important Cultural Property)

  
The Art of Tea Ceremony
Room 4  September 13, 2016 (Tue) - December 11, 2016 (Sun)

This gallery highlights the way of tea through its various art works such as paintings and calligraphy, vases, vessels for kaiseki meals, kettles, tea caddies, and tea bowls.

Current exhibit includes:
Vase with Phoenix Handles, Celadon glaze, Longquan ware, China, Southern Song-Yuan dynasty, 13th century (Gift of Mr. Matsunaga Yasuzaemon)
Tea Caddy with Angular Shoulder, Known as "Shozan", Southern Song-Yuan dynasty, 13th century (Gift of Mr. Harada Kichizo)
Tea Bowl, Black glaze, Haikatsugi Type, Southern Song‐Yuan Dynasty, 13th‐14th century, China (Gift of Mr. Hirota Matsushige)
Letter, By Takeno Jo'o, Muromachi period, 16th century (Gift of Mrs. Yamamoto Tomiko and Mr. Yamamoto Kenji)
Tea Bowl, Aoido type, Known as "Toki-ido", Joseon dynasty, 16th century (Gift of Mr. Hirota Matsushige)

  
Attire of the Military Elite: Heian - Edo period
Room 5 & 6  September 6, 2016 (Tue) - December 11, 2016 (Sun)

Beginning with the sword which is the most important possession of a samurai, this gallery focuses on arms and armor, saddlery, attire of the warriors as well as their portraits and hand-writings.

Current exhibit includes:
Domaru Type Armor, With lacing in kashidori style, red at shoulders, Muromachi period, 15th century (Important Cultural Property, Gift of Mr. Akita Kazusue)
Tachi Sword,
By Sukezane, Kamakura period, 13th century (National Treasure, Lent by Toshogu, Tochigi)
Uchigatana Style Sword Mounting (For tachi sword by Sukezane), With black-lacquered scabbard,
Azuchi-Momoyama - Edo period, 17th century (National Treasure, Lent by Toshogu, Tochigi)
Jinbaori (Coat worn over armor), Crossed scythes design on scarlet wool cloth,
Said to have been used by Kobayakawa Hideaki, Azuchi-Momoyama period, 16th century (Important Cultural Property)

  
Folding Screens and Sliding Door Paintings: Azuchi-Momoyama - Edo period
Room 7  November 1, 2016 (Tue) - December 11, 2016 (Sun)

This gallery is dedicated to the genre of shohei-ga, which includes mural paintings, fusuma paintings and byobu paintings. The room is especially designed for an effective display of grand-scale paintings.

Current exhibit includes:
The Carriage Struggle, By Kano Sanraku, Edo period, dated 1604 (Important Cultural Property)
King Wen Lushang and the Hermits at Mt. Shang,
By Kano Sanraku, Edo period, 17th century (Important Cultural Property)

  
The Arts of Daily Life: Azuchi-Momoyama - Edo period
Room 8  October 25, 2016 (Tue) - January 29, 2017 (Sun)

The maturing of Japanese culture supported by the military and commoner classes continued throughout the Azuchi-Momoyama and Edo periods. This gallery introduces the craft of interior furnishings and daily utensils that adorned the life of the people during these periods.

Current exhibit includes:
Writing Box, Flock of cranes design in maki-e lacquer, Edo period, 18th century (Gift of Mr. Matsunaga Yasuzaemon)
Kosode (Garment with small wrist openings), Stream, flowering plant, house, and insect cage design on purple and yellowish-green tussah silk chirimen crepe ground, Edo period, 19th century
Yogi Bedspread, Mandarin orange and plum design on green crepe, Edo period, 19th century
Tea Kettle, Pine, bamboo, and plum design, Ashiya ware, Shinnari type, Azuchi - Momoyama - Edo period, 16th - 17th century (Lent by the Sato Artcraft Research and Scholarship Foundation)
Large Dish, Partial celadon glaze, treasure design in underglaze blue, Nabeshima ware, Edo period, 17th - 18th century (Lent by the OKURA MUSEUM OF ART, Tokyo)
Large Bowl, Snow-covered bamboo design in iron pigment, By Nin'nami Dohachi, Edo period, 19th century
Large Incense Burner, Juro (god of longevity) design, Sangama ware, By Nin'ami Dohachi, Edo period, dated 1843 (Gift of Mr. Ogura Yasuyuki)

  
Developments in Painting and Calligraphy: Azuchi-Momoyama - Edo period
Room 8  November 1, 2016 (Tue) - December 11, 2016 (Sun)

This gallery introduces the dynamic and multi-faceted world of paintings and calligraphy from the Azuchi-Momoyama to the Edo period.

Current exhibit includes:
Teikanzu (Didactic illustrations for emperors), By Kano Sanraku, Edo period, 17th century
Geju (Buddhist verse),
By Isshi Bunshu, Edo period, dated 1643

  
Noh and Kabuki: Kabuki Costumes
Room 9  October 12, 2016 (Wed) - December 11, 2016 (Sun)

Kabuki performances run in the eleventh month of the old lunar calendar introduced actors who were scheduled to appear at the three official Kabuki theaters of Edo (now Tokyo) in the coming year. The majority of the Kabuki costumes in the collection of the Tokyo National Museum were once worn by Bando Mitsue. With a focus on Kabuki costumes for male roles, this exhibition showcases the beauty of the costumes’ gorgeous, thick embroidery, large, eye-catching patterns, and designs of vivid colors that are unique to Kabuki.

Current exhibit includes:
Haori (Kabuki costume), Target and arrow design on light green satin ground, Edo period, 19th century (Gift of Ms. Takagi Kiyo)
Kitsuke
(Kabuki costume), Trefoil myoga ginger crests on green satin ground, Formerly used by Bando Mitsue, Edo period, 19th century (Gift of Ms. Takagi Kiyo)
Omigoromo
(Kabuki costume), Cloud and autumn grasses design on purple satin ground, Edo period, 19th century (Gift of Mrs. Henry)

  
Ukiyo-e and Fashion in the Edo Period: Ukiyo-e
Room 10  November 22, 2016 (Tue) - December 11, 2016 (Sun)

The story of revenge carried out by the faithful retainers of Ako (in present-day Hyogo) was widely known among the Edo (now Tokyo) populace through the Kabuki play Kanadehon chushingura, and was a seasonal theme since it took place in mid-December. Every performance of Chushingura attracted large audiences from that time, and today, the play is still popular for the end of the year. This ukiyo-e exhibit, the last rotation of this year, features the print series by Katsushika Hokusai themed after the eleven acts of Kanadehon chushingura, together with parodies of the play. Hand-painted works consist of folding screens of early pre-modern genre painting, as well as comic pieces.

Current exhibit includes:
Beauties with Pipe, Artist unknown, Edo period, 17th century (Private collection)
Kanadehon chushingura (The Treasury of Loyal Retainers)
: Act V, By Katsushika Hokusai, Edo period, 19th century
Bodhidharma and Courtesan,
By Katsukawa Shunko, Edo period, dated 1803
End-of-year Cleaning at a Samurai House,
By Kitagawa Utamaro, Edo period, 19th century

  
Ukiyo-e and Fashion in the Edo Period: Fashion
Room 10  October 12, 2016 (Wed) - December 11, 2016 (Sun)

Introduces the fashion of the Edo period townspeople. Enjoy comparing with the ukiyo-e works exhibited in the same room.

Current exhibit includes:
Kosode (Garment with small wrist openings), Basket of flowers and maple design on light blue crepe, Edo period, 18th century
Kosode
(Garment with small wrist openings), Landscape, stream, and pavilion design on white figured satin ground, Edo period, 18th century
Inro (Medicine case), Silver grass and paulownia design in maki-e lacquer, Edo period, 19th century

2nd floor

  
Netsuke: The Prince Takamado Collection
The Prince Takamado Collection Room  October 25, 2016 (Tue) - January 29, 2017 (Sun)

 Including:
Strange Things Do Happen!, By Tachihara Kangyoku, Dated 1992
Melon,
By Kinuyo Hariya, 1996
Ground Cherry,
By Seiho Azuma, 1994
Squirrel,
By Tadamine Nakagawa, 1989
Hatching Snake,
By Susan Wraight, 1993

*This room will be closed for exhibition preparation on Monday, December 16, 2016 - Sunday, January 1, 2017

  
Room T1 & T2  January 2, 2017 (Mon) - January 29, 2017 (Sun)

With this year being the Year of the Rooster, or the Year of the Bird, according to the Chinese zodiac, this exhibition showcases artworks featuring birds under the two themes of “Birds of Dawn” and “Birds of Celebration.”
The first theme, “Birds of Dawn,” highlights roosters. The bird of the Chinese zodiac usually takes the form of a rooster. Roosters, which report daybreak, have been domestic fowl familiar to people since long ago, while they have also been seen in pastimes involving roosters such as cockfights. The exhibits in this section include works featuring roosters as motifs as well as those showing the relationship between roosters and people.
The second theme, “Birds of Celebration,” presents birds that bring happiness. The birds featured in these artworks include those with auspicious associations, such as hawks, peacocks, cranes, herons, and mandarin ducks, as well as imaginary birds that also bring good fortune such as phoenixes and garudas.

Current exhibit includes:
Fowl, By Soga Chokuan (dates unknown), Azuchi-Momoyama period, 16th century (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Hokiin, Wakayama)
Cockerel and Bamboo,
By Luo Chuang (dates unknown), Southern Song dynasty, 13th century (Important Cultural Property)
Fowl with Pine and Plum,
By Ito Jakuchu, Edo period, 18th century
Album of Old Rituals: Watching a Cockfight,
Meiji era, 19th century
Flowers and Birds,
By Kaiho Yusetsu, Edo period, 17th century
Bugaku
Mask, Korobase type, Heian period, dated 1042 (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Tamukeyama Hachimangu, Nara)
Hoken
Style Sword Mounting, Paulownia, bamboo, and phoenix design in maki-e lacquer on nashiji lacquer ground, Metal fittings by Ichijo, Edo period, dated 1864

1st floor Special Exhibition

  
Room T5  September 13, 2016 (Tue) - December 11, 2016 (Sun)

Rakuyaji (Koka City, Shiga Prefecture), an ancient temple of the Tendai sect of Buddhism, has preserved twenty Buddhist statues from the Heian period (794–1192) designated Important Cultural Properties. This number is outstanding even in Shiga Prefecture, where a many fine Buddhist statues remain to this day. This exhibition is the first opportunity to show all twenty of these statues outside Rakuyaji Temple.

1st floor

  
Japanese Sculpture
Room 11  October 25, 2016 (Tue) - February 5, 2017 (Sun)

This gallery introduces the history of sculptural art in Japan through prototypical wood-sculptures featuring examples dating from the Heian and Kamakura periods, the zenith of Japanese sculpture.

Current exhibit includes:
Seated Male Shinto Deity, Heian period, 11th century (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Daishogunhachi jinja, Kyoto)
Seated Benzai Ten (Sarasvati),
Kamakura period, 13th century (Private collection)
Standing Juni Shinsho (Twelve Heavenly Generals): Shishin (Snake General),
Formerly preserved at Joruriji, Kyoto, Kamakura period, 13th century (Important Cultural Property)
Seated Priest Horen,
Kamakura period, 13th-14th century (Lent by the OKURA MUSEUM OF ART, Tokyo)

  
Lacquerware
Room 12  October 4, 2016 (Tue) - December 23, 2016 (Fri)

Features maki-e works from Heian to Edo period. The exhibit shows the history and beauty of maki-e, a unique lacquerwork method that developed in Japan.

Current exhibition includes:
Writing Box, Scene portraying a poem known as "Otokoyama" in maki-e lacquer, Muromachi period, 15th century (Important Cultural Property)
Writing Box, Bugaku dance design in maki-e lacquer, Attributed to Hon'ami Koetsu, Edo period, 17th century (Important Cultural Property)
Box for Priest's Vestments, Seascape design in maki-e lacquer, Heian period, 10th century (National Treasure, Lent by Kyo'ogokokuji, Kyoto)
Tiered Stand, Design of scenes from The Tale of Genji in maki-e lacquer, Attributed to Hon'ami Koetsu, Edo period, 17th century (Important Cultural Property)

  
Metalwork: bon’ongu
Room 13  September 27, 2016 (Tue) - December 23, 2016 (Fri)

Sound-producing implements known as bon’ongu are used to symbolically purify the premises and also to signify pauses in Buddhist rituals. They include implements that are struck, such as gongs and large bells, as well as ones that are shaken, such as small bells and metal staves with attached rings. Because these implements were used for their acoustic effects, they were created mainly from cast bronze. Their metallic sounds, both sharp and pure, heightened the religious atmosphere during ceremonies. These implements, however, are also highly decorative. We invite visitors to examine their forms, beautiful both for their functionality and decoration, and see the stylistic changes that occurred over the ages.

Current exhibit includes:
Finial of Priest's Staff, Excavated at Mount Dainichi, Toyama, Heian period, 11th century (Important Cultural Property, Private collection)
Finial of Priest's Staff,
Heian period, dated 1142 (Important Cultural Property, Lent by Tesshuji, Shizuoka)
Waniguchi
Gong, Excavated at Miyabuchi, Matsumoto-shi, Nagano, Heian period, dated 1001 (Important Cultural Property, Gift of Mr. Takahashi Tamotsu)
Kei
GongLotus pond design, Excavated at Kinpusen, Tenkawa-mura, Yoshino-gun, Nara, Heian period, 12th century (Important Cultural Property)

  
Japanese Swords
Room 13  November 15, 2016 (Tue) - February 5, 2017 (Sun)

Exhibits selected swords and sword-fittings from the Heian to Edo periods, including the Tanto Sword, Known as "Atsushi Toshiro", By Yoshimitsu.

Current exhibit includes:
Tanto Sword, Known as "Atsushi Toshiro", By Yoshimitsu, Kamakura period, 13th century (National Treasure)
Tachi
Sword, Known as "Ima Aranami", By Ichimonji school, Kamakura period, 13th century (Important Cultural Property)
Tanto
Sword, By Sadamune, Kamakura period, 14th century (National Treasure, Lent by the Agency for Cultural Affairs)
Sword Guard, Rising sun and plover design,
By Yasuchika, Edo period, 18th century (Important Cultural Property, Private collection, On exhibit from November 22, 2016)

  
Ceramics
Room 13  October 4, 2016 (Tue) - December 23, 2016 (Fri)

From Japan's first glazed ceramics of the Nara period to the various wares of the late Edo period, the exhibits will introduce the history of Japanese ceramics through masterworks according to time period and production sites.

Current exhibit includes:
Large Jar, Natural glaze, Tokoname ware, Heian period, 12th century (Important Cultural Property, Private collection)
Large-mouthed Jar, Yellow glaze with peony arabesque design,
Seto ware, Kamakura period, 14th century (Important Cultural Property)
Sandbank-shaped Bowl with Handle,
Mino ware, Oribe type, Edo period, 17th century (Gift of Mr. Mino Susumu)
Square Dish, Design of Chinese figure watching seagulls in underglaze iron,
By Ogata Korin and Shinsei, Edo period, 18th century (Important Cultural Property)
Large Dish, Watermill design in underglaze blue, partly with celadon glaze,
Nabeshima ware, Edo period, 17th-18th century (Private collection)
Large Dish, Flower and bird design in overglaze enamel,
Imari ware, Edo period, 17th century (Lent by the OKURA MUSEUM OF ART, Tokyo)

  
Room 14  September 27, 2016 (Tue) - December 18, 2016 (Sun)

A British man arrived in Japan in the winter of 1876. His name was Christopher Dresser (1834?1904), a renowned designer who was one of the major figures of the Japonisme movement in Western art. He brought decorative art objects from Europe, collected by the South Kensington Museum (forerunner of the Victoria and Albert Museum) as gifts to Japan. The gifts were by the courtesy of the South Kensington Museum director, who heard news that the freight steamer Nil sank on its way to Japan, carrying valued items that Japan exhibited and purchased at the Vienna World Exposition of 1873. After his fruitful stay, Dresser also sent two groups of artworks from Britain to Japan.
This exhibition features ceramics and glass vessels from Europe and America, which the Tokyo National Museum acquired in the early Meiji era.

Current exhibit includes:
Flattened Jar, Multicolor glaze, applied floral arabesque design, By Minton & Co., United Kingdom, Dated 1873 (Gift of Mr. Colin Minton Campbell)
Decorative Dish, Insect and fish design in relief with overglaze polychromy,
Germany, 19th century (Gift of Londos & Co.)
Decorative Flat JarJapanese life and customs design on blue ground,
By Christopher Dresser (1834-1904) for Minton & Co., United Kingdom, 19th century (Gift of Londos Company)
Vase, Clear glass, incised frog and dragonfly design,
United Kingdom, 19th century
Bowl, Clear glass, incised floral design,
United Kingdom, 19th century
Footed Vase, Leaf design in green and brown,
By Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933) for Tiffany & Co., United States, 19th century (Gift of Mr. Louis Comfort Tiffany)

  
Room 14  December 20, 2016 (Tue) - February 19, 2017 (Sun)

Fukusa were used to cover gifts presented at celebrations. It was from the early to mid- Edo period, in the 17th to the early 18th century, that fukusa came to be ornately decorated. Eventually, from the late 18th century in the late Edo period, the custom of fukusa covers spread to prosperous townspeople. Unlike the stylized patterns used by the higher warrior class, the townspeople chose motifs from popular fables, or patternized motifs from everyday life, for their liberal designs. By this time, fukusa were not only rendered with embroidery but also with techniques suitable for pictorial renderings, including yuzen paste-resist dyeing, as well as tapestry weaving. The designs convey the festive spirits of people in the Edo period.
To celebrate the New Year, fukusa from the Edo period in the museum collection are introduced through four themes in this exhibition: “Stories and fables,” “Good-luck motifs,” “Warrior-class motifs,” and “Deities and festivities.” These motifs will introduce you to the visual expression arising from the celebratory spirit of the people from this time.

Including:
Fukusa (Gift cover), Shojo immortal figure design, Edo period, 18th-19th century (Gift of Mrs. Henry)
Fukusa (Gift cover), Sea bream design on dark blue satin ground, Edo period, 18th-19th century (Gift of Mrs. Henry)
Fukusa (Gift cover), Cherry blossom and peacock design on green satin ground, Edo period, 19th century
Fukusa(Gift Cover), Design of a Hotei (one of the Seven Deities of Good Fortune) and Chinese children on light red seigo weave silk, Edo period, 19th century (Gift of Mr.Hosoya Hiroyoshi)

  
Records of History
Room 15  October 18, 2016 (Tue) - December 18, 2016 (Sun)

Tokyo National Museum includes a large collection of historical objects and documents. This collection began with objects previously owned by the Edo shogunate government. From the museum's establishment in 1872 (Meiji 5) onward, the collection grew through the holding of exhibitions as well as surveys of cultural properties.
This exhibition displays various historical records and objects. These include maps from the Edo period (1603–1868) and Meiji era (1868–1912), in addition to illustrated albums relating to academic fields and industry. Selected pieces from the TNM’s extensive collection of photographs dating back to the end of the Edo period, which show the individuals, landscapes, expositions, and cultural properties of those times, are also exhibited.

Current exhibit includes:
Map of Kozuke Province (Present-day Gunma prefecture), Edo period, 19th century
Tomioka Silk MillInterior view,
Dated 1877

  
Ainu and Ryuku: Life of the Ainu People
Room 16  September 27, 2016 (Tue) - December 18, 2016 (Sun)

The Ainu people have long dwelled in the harsh climate of Japan’s northernmost regions, including Hokkaido and its neighboring islands, worshipping and living in harmony with nature.
This exhibition introduces the traditional Ainu way of life through an array of hunting, fishing, and weaving tools, fabrics and garments, as well as wooden dishes.

Current exhibit includes:
Model of Storage House, Hokkaido Ainu, 19th century (Transferred from the Bureau for the Vienna World Exposition)
Kina
Mat, Hokkaido Ainu, 19th century (Transferred from the Bureau for the Vienna World Exposition, On exhibit through November 6, 2016)
Kina
Mat, Hokkaido Ainu, 19th century (Transferred from the Bureau for the Vienna World Exposition, On exhibit from Nobember 8, 2016)
Marek
HarpoonFor catching salmons, Hokkaido Ainu, 19th century (Transferred from the Bureau for the Vienna World Exposition)
Coat,
Hokkaido Ainu, 19th century (Gift of Mr.Tokugawa Yorisada, On exhibit through November 6, 2016)
Striped Robe,
Hokkaido Ainu, 19th century (Gift of Mr. Tokugawa Yorisada, On exhibit from Nobember 8, 2016)
Model of Boat,
Hokkaido Ainu, 19th century (Gift of the Hokkaido Administration Office)

  
Conservation and Restoration
Room 17  April 15, 2014 (Tue) - April 9, 2017 (Sun)

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The preservation and conservation of cultural properties are essential aspects of our Museum's mission. From this point of view, this room features object research and examination, environmental maintenance of storage and exhibition rooms, and conservation procedures applied in accordance to materials and conditions of the objects.

 

  
Modern Art
Room 18  December 6, 2016 (Tue) - January 22, 2017 (Sun)

This gallery features paintings and sculptures from the Meiji to Taisho period. Since it first opened in 1872 as the exposition venue of the Ministry of Education, Tokyo National Museum has collected important artworks that signify the development of modern Japanese art. The exhibit consists of selected works from the collection.

Current exhibit includes:
Yoroboshi (Pricipal Character of Noh Dorama "Yoroboshi"), By Shimomura Kanzan, Dated 1915 (Important Cultural Property)
Portrait of Okubo Koto,
By Takahashi Yuichi, Dated 1881
Portrait of Uesugi Yozan,
By Takahashi Yuichi, Dated 1881
Princess Shakuntala and King Dushyanta,
By Sato Chozan, Dated 1916 (On exhibit through January 15, 2017)
Flower Vase, Hosoge floral arabesque design, By Sekizawa Uichi, Dated 1892 (Gift of Japan Delegate Office for World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago)

  
Education Center: Education Space
Room 19  April 15, 2014 (Tue) - April 9, 2017 (Sun)

Designing at TNM
Exploring The TNM Collection
Making at TNM
Searching for National Treasures at TNM
Touching TNM

  
Room 19  September 13, 2016 (Tue) - April 16, 2017 (Sun)

Urazaishiki is a technique used in Eastern painting traditions, whereby natural pigments and gold leaf are applied to the reverse side of silk paintings.  This technique influences the appearance of the colors applied to the front of the painting.
Here, we showcase this method using Ichijikinrin (Ekaksara-usnisacakra), a Buddhist deity painting in the Tokyo National Museum’s collection.