TOP
 >> Exhibitions
 >> Chinese Calligraphy: Calligraphy of the Ming and Qing Dynasties Item List

Chinese Calligraphy: Calligraphy of the Ming and Qing Dynasties

"Chinese Calligraphy: Calligraphy of the Ming and Qing Dynasties"

Toyokan Room 8  March 5, 2019 (Tue) - April 21, 2019 (Sun)

  
Poems by Wang Wei in Cursive Script (detail), By Zhang Ruitu, China, Ming dynasty, 16th–17th century

Calligraphy of the Chinese Ming dynasty (1368-1644) was based on the calligraphic techniques of the Eastern Jin dynasty and the Tang dynasty. In the 16th century, Wen Zhengming was active in Wu (now Suzhou, Jiangsu province), creating elegant calligraphy with its roots in the classics. In 17th-century Songjiang (now Songjiang district, Shanghai), Dong Qichang advocated a vibrant calligraphic style in a break from tradition. This style was carried on by Huang Daozhou, Wang Duo and other calligraphers at the end of the Ming dynasty. During the Qing dynasty (1616-1911), which was governed by the Manchu people, mainstream calligraphy shifted its focus from studying from copybooks of classic calligraphy to studying from inscriptions on stone steles and monuments. This exhibition introduces the varied calligraphic styles of the Ming and Qing dynasties.

Current exhibit includes:
Poems by Wang Wei in Cursive Script, By Zhang Ruitu, China, Ming dynasty, 16th–17th century
Poems in Running Script Presented to Manshi, By Ruan Yuan, China, Qing dynasty, 19th century, China (Gift of Mr. Takashima Kikujiro)
Quatrain in Seven-character Phrases in Cursive Script, By Huang Daozhou, China, Ming dynasty, 16th–17th century (Gift of Mr. Aoyama San'u)
Inscription on the Paintings of Nine Aged Men in Standard Script, By Jin Nong, China, Qing dynasty, 17th–18th century (Gift of Mr. Aoyama San'u)
Transcription of Shiguwen, By Wu Changshuo, Republic period, dated 1917 (Gift of Dr. Hayashi Munetake)