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Chinese Painting: The Spread of Court Style Landscape Paintings

"Chinese Painting: The Spread of Court Style Landscape Paintings"

Asian Gallery (Toyokan) Room 8  June 20, 2017 (Tue) - July 23, 2017 (Sun)

  
Scholar Overlooking a Misty Valley (detail), By Attributed to Sun Junze, Yuan dynasty, 13th century (Important Cultural Property)

The court style of landscape painting, brought to a high level of accomplishment by Ma Yuan and Xia Gui of the Sourthern Song dynasty (1127–1279), became one of the standard styles and maintained its influence into the Yuan dynasty (1271–1368) and beyond. In particular, during the Ming dynasty (1368–1644), irregular brushwork came to be featured among various revival styles based on the works of Ma Yuan and Xia Gui. This irregular style became widespread among independent professional painters in cities of the Jiangnan region at the end of the Ming dynasty. Characterized by rough brushwork, the painters were collectively referred to as the Zhe School. This exhibition looks into the development and transformation of landscape paintings from the 13th to the 19th century, beginning with the Song-dynasty court.

Current exhibit includes:
Landscape, Attributed to Xia Gui, Yuan dynasty, 13th century
Scholar Overlooking a Misty Valley, By Attributed to Sun Junze, Yuan dynasty, 13th century (Important Cultural Property)
Solitary Angler on a Wintry River, By Zhu Duan, Ming dynasty, 16th century (Important Cultural Property)
Fisherman, By Zhang Lu, Ming dynasty, 16th century(Important Cultural Property, Lent by Gokokuji, Tokyo)
Angler Playing the Flute on a River in Autumn, By Jiang Song, Ming dynasty, 16th century (Private collection)