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Chinese Textiles: Treasure Design

"Chinese Textiles: Treasure Design"

Asian Gallery (Toyokan) Room 5  October 25, 2016 (Tue) - January 15, 2017 (Sun)

  
Gold Brocade, Known as "Tomita kinran"; cloud and treasure design on sappanwood red ground (detail), Passed down by the Maeda clan, Ming dynasty, 15th-16th century

The treasure design is an auspicious pattern that features scattered treasures that have long been considered lucky items in China. In the Ming dynasty (1368–1644), this design became popular for textiles, while the eight treasures were likened to the Eight Immortals and were used in various decorative art objects in the Qing dynasty (1616–1912). Various treasure motifs other than the eight treasures can also be combined. In Japan, imported gold brocades with these treasure designs, which were cherished by tea practitioners of Edo (now Tokyo), are called “famed textiles.” Furthermore, the treasure design is often seen in textile works of high renown. This exhibition showcases Chinese treasure designs while explaining the meaning of each treasure motif. 

Current exhibit includes:
Damask, Known as "Iyo sudare donsu"; plum and treasures design on checkered ground, Passed down by the Maeda clan, Ming dynasty, 16th-17th century
Gold Brocade, Known as "Tomita kinran"; cloud and treasure design on sappanwood red ground,
Passed down by the Maeda clan, Ming dynasty, 15th-16th century