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Chinese Calligraphy: Calligraphy in the Ming Dynasty

"Chinese Calligraphy: Calligraphy in the Ming Dynasty"

Toyokan Room 8  June 10, 2014 (Tue) - July 27, 2014 (Sun)

  
Poems in Cursive Script, By Zhu Yunming, China, Ming dynasty, dated 1521 (Gift of Mr. Takashima Kikujiro)

In the second half of the 16th century, the Ming dynasty went into economic decline, but in the field of calligraphy, Dong Qichang rebelled against the formal style of Wen Zhengming and strived for calligraphy that expressed raw emotion. Influenced by this calligraphy, Ruan Yuanlu, Zhang Ruitu, Wang Duo and others created a style that conveyed irrepressible emotions. In this way, Ming-dynasty calligraphy reached its full maturity. This exhibition displays the development of Chinese calligraphy from the mid- to the late Ming dynasty.
Current exhibit includes:
Poems in Cursive Script, By Zhu Yunming, China, Ming dynasty, dated 1521 (Gift of Mr. Takashima Kikujiro)
Thousand Character Classic in Cursive Script, By Wen Zhengming, China, Ming dynasty, dated 1545 (Gift of Mr. Aoyama San'u)
Poem in Running and Cursive Script, By Dong Qichang, China, Ming dynasty, dated 1621
Poem in Four Lines of Seven-character Phrases in Cursive Script, By Huang Daozhou, China, Ming dynasty, 16th - 17th century (Gift of Mr. Aoyama San'u)
Poem in Four Lines of Seven Characters in Cursive Script, By Qi Zhijia, China, Ming - Qing dynasty, 17th century (Gift of Mr. Aoyama San'u)