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Ukiyo-e and Fashion in the Edo Period: Ukiyo-e

"Ukiyo-e and Fashion in the Edo Period: Ukiyo-e"

Japanese Gallery (Honkan) Room 10  July 15, 2014 (Tue) - August 3, 2014 (Sun)

  
Lilies, By Katsushika Hokusai, Edo period, 19th century (Important Art Object)

In the early Edo period (1603-1868), ukiyo-e, which are depictions of commoners' lives in the Edo period, were only in the form of paintings. Later on, a method of woodblock printing was devised and mass production of ukiyo-e became possible. Eventually, a method of producing multicolored nishiki-e prints was established, following the further development of carving and printing techniques. Based on subjects popular among commoners, such as the pleasure quarters or Kabuki theatre, nishiki-e developed primarily through yakusha-e prints of actors and bijinga portraits of beautiful women, leading to the creation of various other genres, including prints of birds and flowers, narrative tales, and landscapes.
This exhibition shows works full of seasonal references: genre paintings featuring summery scenes at the water's edge, including cooling off in the evening and watching fireworks, as well as prints featuring summery flowers such as morning glories and lilies. Also on display are series of nishiki-e prints: Sixty-nine Stations of Kiso Kaido Highway by Keisai Eisen (1791–1848) and One Hundred Poems Explained by a Nurse by Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849).
Current exhibit includes:
Woman Reading a Letter Outside Mosquito Net, By Torii Kiyomasu, Edo period, 18th century
Fireworks at Ryogoku, By Kitagawa Utamaro, Edo period, 18th century
Lilies, By Katsushika Hokusai, Edo period, 19th century (Important Art Object)
Cooling Off on a Boat under Azuma Bridge, By Torii Kiyonaga, Edo period, 18th century
 

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