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The Twentieth Century for Chinese Landscape Painting: Selected Masterpieces from the National Art Museum of China

The Twentieth Century for Chinese Landscape Painting: Selected Masterpieces from the National Art Museum of China / Honkan Room T5   July 31, 2012 (Tue) - August 26, 2012 (Sun)

  
Mount Putuo, Wu Guanzhong, 1980, National Art Museum of China

Contemporary Chinese art, which continues to thrive, arguably has its origins in the achievements of many modern Chinese painters who lived during the turbulent 20th century. This exhibition features 50 representative works of 20th-century landscape painting selected from the National Art Museum of China (Beijing), a museum with a world-leading collection of paintings in this field. Through these works, the exhibition explores trends and movements in modern Chinese painting.

There have been large revolutions in China in the modern era: the Xinhai Revolution, the establishment of the People's Republic of China, and the Reform and Opening-up Policy. During this time, Chinese painters tirelessly pursued their own outlets for creativity. Some painters strove for a revival of classical Chinese painting, some turned to new creative ideas in Japan and the West, and some tackled the drastically-changing Chinese society head-on. In these ways they were all searching for new forms of expression. This exhibition looks back on the earnest efforts of 20th-century Chinese painters from the three viewpoints of responding to tradition, to Western art techniques, and to society and lifestyle.

Through treasured masterpieces that show connections between enduring traditional Chinese culture and the contemporary Chinese art scene, this exhibition presents the unique appeal of 20th-century Chinese landscape painting.
 

General Information

Period Tuesday, July 31  - Sunday, August 26, 2012
Venue Honkan Room T5, Tokyo National Museum (Ueno Park)
Hours 9:30 - 17:00
Saturdays, Sundays, Holidays until 18:00
Fridays until 20:00
(Last entry 30 minutes before closing)
Closed Mondays (Except for Monday, August 13)
Admission Adults: 600 (500) yen
University Students: 400 (300) yen
* ( ) indicate prices for those in groups of 20 or more.
* Persons with disabilities are admitted free with one accompanying person each.
* High/Junior High/Elementary School Students and persons under 18 and over 70: Free
Please show proof of age (driver's license, passport, etc.) when entering.
Access 10 minutes' walk from JR Ueno Station (Park exit) and Uguisudani Station
15 minutes' walk from Keisei Ueno Station, Tokyo Metro Ueno Station and Tokyo Metro Nezu Station
Organizer Agency for Cultural Affairs, Ministry of Culture of the People's Republic of China, Tokyo National Museum, National Art Museum of China
With the Support of The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan, Embassy of The People's Republic of China in Japan, friendship year for Japan-China people-to-people exchanges, JAPAN-CHINA FRIENDSHIP ASSOCIATION, The Association for the Promotion of International Trade, Japan, Japan-China Cultural Exchange Association, Japan-China Friendship Parliamentarians' Union, JAPAN-CHINA ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION, THE JAPAN-CHINA SOCIETY, INC, JAPAN-CHINA FRIENDSHIP CENTER
With the special assistance of The Mainichi Newspapers
General Inquiries 03-5405-8686 (Hello Dial)

Related Events

Honkan Room 20  August 3, 2012 (Fri)   18:30 - 19:00   RESERVE_DAY
Honkan Room 20  August 10, 2012 (Fri)   18:30 - 19:00   RESERVE_DAY
<Lectures>   Response to Tradition
Honkan Room 20  August 17, 2012 (Fri)   18:30 - 19:00   RESERVE_DAY
Heiseikan Auditorium  August 5, 2012 (Sun)   13:30 - 15:00   RESERVE_DAY

Pamphlet

The Twentieth Century for Chinese Landscape Painting: Selected Masterpieces from the National Art Museum of China

The Twentieth Century for Chinese Landscape Painting: Selected Masterpieces from the National Art Museum of China

The pamphlet is distributed in RoomT5, Honkan during the thematic exhibition periods
PDFPDF, 3.36MB)

 

Highlight of the Exhibition

Part I: The Evolution and Transmission of Tradition

Crossing the River in Autumn Rain, Chen Shaomei, 1955, National Art Museum of China
Crossing the River in Autumn Rain,
By Chen Shaomei, 1955,
National Art Museum of China
  Modern Chinese painting has developed through the transmission of an enormous tradition. Traditional painting, as represented by literati painting, existed as a major subject for modern painters to overcome, while simultaneously being a constant source of creation for these painters. For example, Wu Changshuo and the Shanghai School developed a vigorous painting style that incorporated elements of epigraphs. On the other hand, Pan Tianshou rediscovered and studied idiosyncratic painters such as Bada Shanren and Shi Tao, who were active from the end of the Ming to the beginning of the Qing dynasty in about the 17th to 18th century. This part introduces how modern Chinese painters created their art through studying traditional painting styles.

>>more

 

Part II: Rivalry with Western Art Techniques

Osprey, Lin Fengmian, 1961, National Art Museum of China
Osprey,
By Lin Fengmian, 1961,
National Art Museum of China
    From the end of the Qing dynasty (1644-1911), many painters traveled abroad for study, which brought transformations to Chinese painting. The destination for the painters was initially the neighboring country of Japan, but later this spread to Europe for undertaking extensive studies. Artists without the opportunities to travel also had access to foreign art through illustrations in art books, which were published in large numbers at the time. These artists particularly took Western painting methods as their sources of inspiration. This part features works by artists who were greatly influenced by art from abroad.

>>more

 

Part III: Response to Society and Lifestyle

After the establishment of the People’s Republic of China, the creativity of painters faced many changes. They were expected to paint for the people and society, in a way which was distant from the traditional genre of literati painting. Painters therefore pursued a new style of landscape painting compatible with the social change. This part presents an overview of the unique accomplishments of landscape painting after the establishment of the People’s Republic of China, with a focus on representative artists from the four areas of Beijing, Xi’an, Nanjing, and Guangdong.

>>more

  The Clarity of the Yellow River, Fu Baoshi, 1960, National Art Museum of China
The Clarity of the Yellow River,
By Fu Baoshi, 1960,
National Art Museum of China